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Genes and gender: new shots fired on the Y front

PARIS — Theories that men will eventually become extinct because the Y chromosome which determines maleness is shrinking are quite wrong, according to a gene study published on Wednesday. The men-are-doomed scenario leapt to prominence nearly a decade ago when scientists found that the male chromosome had dramatically shrivelled. It…

Fresh scandal embroils U.S. climate science debate

WASHINGTON — A fresh scandal over climate change has erupted in the United States after leaked documents appeared to show a right-wing funded campaign to influence how climate science is taught in schools. The internal budget and strategy documents from a Chicago-based non-profit group called the Heartland Institute were made…

New amateur video of Challenger disaster released

After over 25 years, newly discovered footage of the Challenger shuttle disaster is thought to be only the second piece of amateur footage in existence. Bob Karman provided New Scientist with the VHS video he took while vacationing with his family at Disney World in 1986. The video was digitized…

Engineer invents floating solar panels

Rays of the winter sun bounce off gleaming mirrors on the tiny lake of Colignola in Italy, where engineers have built a cost-effective prototype for floating, rotating solar panels. “You are standing on a photovoltaic floating plant which tracks the sun, it’s the first platform of its kind in the world!” said Marco…

Stem cell implants boost monkeys with Parkinson’s

Monkeys suffering from Parkinson’s disease show a marked improvement when human embryonic stem cells are implanted in their brains, in what a Japanese researcher said Wednesday was a world first. A team of scientists transplanted the stem cells into four primates that were suffering from the debilitating disease. The monkeys all had violent shaking…

Heart attack with no chest pain more likely in women

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Women, especially younger women, are more likely than men to show up at the hospital with no chest pain or discomfort after having a heart attack, a new study suggests. Those symptoms, or lack of symptoms, can result in delayed medical care and differences in…

BASF buys electrolytes business from top rival

BASF, the world’s biggest chemicals maker, said Tuesday it has agreed to buy the electrolytes business for high-performance batteries from rival Merck KGaA for an undisclosed sum. The acquisition ”enhances the expertise we offer to automotive andbattery manufacturers around the world,” said board memberAndreas Kreimeyer. Electrolytes ensure the transport of electric charges inside a battery. “The electrolyte portfolio…

Brain study finds what eases pain of financial loss

LONDON (Reuters) – Financial market traders and keen gamblers take note. Scientists have found that a chemical in the region of the brain involved in sensory and reward systems is crucial to whether people simply brush off the pain of financial losses. Scientists say the study points the way to…

Scientists regenerate 30,000 year-old plant

Fruit seeds stored away by squirrels more than 30,000 years ago and found in Siberian permafrost have been regenerated into full flowering plants by scientists in Russia, a new study has revealed. The seeds of the herbaceous Silene stenophylla are far and away the oldest plant tissue to have been…

Stark warning emerges from summit: science is ‘under siege’

A stark theme emerged from an annual scientific get-together in Vancouver: the world must be helped to believe in science again or it could be too late to save our planet. Science is “under siege,” top academics and educators were warned repeatedly at the American Association for the Advancement of…

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