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First ‘test-tube’ hamburger to be produced this year

The world’s first “test-tube” meat, a hamburger made from a cow’s stem cells, will be produced this fall, Dutch scientist Mark Post told a major science conference on Sunday. Post’s aim is to invent an efficient way to produce skeletal muscle tissue in a laboratory that exactly mimics meat, and…

Santorum: Prenatal testing is to ‘encourage abortions’

Republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum on Sunday suggested that “Obamacare” required free prenatal testing coverage because President Barack Obama wanted to see more disabled babies aborted. The former Pennsylvania senators had told supporters on Saturday that the Affordable Care Act just created the requirement “because free prenatal testing ends up…

Single-atom transistor busts the records

PARIS — Researchers in Australia said on Sunday they had made with pinpoint accuracy a working transistor consisting of a single atom, marking a major stride towards next-generation computing. The device comprises a single phosphorus atom, etched into a silicon bed, with “gates” to control electrical flow and metallic contacts…

Controversial bird flu study gets publication go-ahead after security check

Bird flu experts meeting in Geneva ruled that controversial research on a mutant form of the virus potentially capable of being spread among humans should be made public. Security assessments must however be carried out first before the two studies can be published and the research can continue, scientists agreed…

Wildfires kill 339,000 people per year: study

Wildfires, peat fires and controlled burns on farming lands kill 339,000 people worldwide each year, said a study released on Saturday that is the first to estimate a death toll for landscape fires. Most of those deaths are concentrated in sub-Saharan Africa, where an estimated 157,000 people die as a…

Before they can speak, babies make friends: study

Babies still too small to speak know how to make jokes and form friendships, say researchers at an Australian university who have spent two years filming the behaviour of young children. Academics at Charles Sturt University are studying how children interact with other infants while in childcare using footage obtained…

Diet soda tied to heart attack, stroke risks: study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Diet soda may benefit the waistline, but a new study suggests that people who drink it every day have a heightened risk of heart attack and stroke. The study, which followed almost 2,600 older adults for a decade, found that those who drank diet soda…

Insurance eligibility improves medical care: study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – A new study suggests young adults are more likely to get care and see a doctor when states extend the time they can stay on their parents’ health insurance — a measure also mandated by the 2010 federal health care law. The laws are meant…

Study questions antidepressant-suicide link

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – The Food and Drug Administration has a blanket warning on antidepressant medications stating they increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among kids and young adults, but a new review of clinical data finds no link between suicide and at least two of the…

Fukishima radiation ruled out, for now, as cause of Alaska seal deaths

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (Reuters) – Preliminary tests appear to rule out radiation from Japan’s tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear power plant as the cause of mysterious deaths and illness that struck scores of Alaska seals last year, federal officials said on Friday. Preliminary tests of tissue samples from animals that fell victim to…

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