Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 362)

24,000 ducks destroyed in Australia after bird flu

Some 24,000 Australian ducks were being destroyed Wednesday after testing positive for a low pathogenic strain of the bird flu virus, an outbreak which has prompted poultry export bans in parts of Asia. The Australian Chicken Meat Foundation said the outbreak of the strain of avian influenza appeared to be confined to two…

Testosterone can skew one’s judgement: study

Testosterone can skew one’s judgement, creating the impression that decisions are best taken alone even in situations that call for collaboration, according to a study released Wednesday. In a clever set of experiments, scientists led by Nicholas Wright at the University of London showed that women given a dose of…

Oldest known croc had a shield-like head: study

The oldest known species of crocodile had an armor-plated head and a body half the length of a subway car, according to research released Tuesday by US scientists who identified the now-extinct creature. Nicknamed “Shieldcroc” for its impressive head plate, the aquatic reptile swam in the waters of Africa some…

U.S. approves new drug for rare cystic fibrosis

WASHINGTON — US regulators on Tuesday approved Kalydeco, a new, gene-targeted drug treatment for people who have a rare kind of the incurable lung disease cystic fibrosis. Made by the Massachusetts-based Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Kalydeco (ivacaftor) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration on a fast-track for drugs that…

Calories count, but not where they come from: study

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Sticking to diets with strict proportions of fat, carbs and protein may not be more effective for people who want to lose weight and fat mass than simply cutting back on calories, according to a new comparison of four diets. The results suggest that it…

FDA doctors, scientists claim illegal surveillance

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Food and Drug Administration secretly monitored the private emails of staff doctors and scientists who alleged the agency was approving medical devices that posed a danger to patients, according to federal court documents. In a lawsuit filed last week in U.S. District Court in Washington, six…

Snakes blamed for ‘severe declines’ in Florida wildlife

WASHINGTON — Across southern Florida, rabbits, raccoons, bobcats and foxes have been disappearing at dramatic rates over the past decade, and invasive Burmese pythons are to blame, a US study said Monday. The big snakes which are native to southeast Asia have been devouring all kinds of wildlife leading to…

Scientists shift on brain speech center: study

WASHINGTON — The part of the brain used for speech processing is in a different location than originally believed, according to a US study Monday that researchers said will require a rewrite of medical texts. Wernicke’s area, named after the German neurologist who proposed it in the late 1800s, was…

C-sections don’t contribute to obese children: study

(Reuters) – Children born by Cesarean section are no more likely to become obese than if they are born vaginally, according to a Brazilian study. Past research from Brazil had found a link between excessive weight and C-sections, leading some scientists to suggest that not being exposed to bacteria from the birth canal could…

Ultrasound zaps could be male contraceptive

Zapping testicles with ultrasound can reduce sperm counts and might be used in the future as an inexpensive, reliable and reversible male contraceptive, according to US researchers. Scientists from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, who conducted experiments on male rats, issued their findings on Saturday in the journal Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology.…

Google+