Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 369)

The 2,000-year-old computer you’ve never heard of

Right, that’s enough of the Queen for now. Have you ever heard of the Antikythera mechanism? You have? Well done. If not, I suspect you’re in good company and the fact that I learned about it from a fascinating BBC4 programme – the high point of my jubilee weekend –…

Solar plane lands in Morocco on historic flight

A solar plane made history Tuesday by landing in the Moroccan capital after flying across the Strait of Gibraltar from Spain on the world’s first intercontinental flight in a plane powered by the sun. Bertrand Piccard, a 54-year-old Swiss psychiatrist and balloonist, landed Solar Impulse at 11:30 pm (2230 GMT)…

Blood test ‘can save breast cancer patients’ lives’

A simple blood test can save lives by helping doctors swiftly diagnose whether a patient with early breast cancer faces high risk of death or relapse after treatment, specialists said Wednesday. Tumour cells in a blood sample, when taken at an early stage of the disease, are an accurate predictor of a patient’s survival chances, the team…

Bath salts: Gruesome Miami attack adds to drug’s bizarre history

Bath salts: Gruesome Miami attack adds to drug's bizarre history (via The Christian Science Monitor) Months before the lurid case of a Miami man who allegedly cannibalized a homeless man’s face, police and emergency officials as far flung as Maine and Louisiana were coping with their own surreal 911 calls…

Climate change to cost Latin America $100 billion by 2050

Global warming could exact a devastating toll on the economies of Latin America and the Caribbean, with costs possibly exceeding $100 billion by 2050, the Inter-American Development Bank warned Tuesday. In a new report, the Washington-based organization also called for “forceful” reductions in greenhouse gases to forestall some of the…

Rare transit of Venus draws sky-gazers worldwide

Sky-gazers around the world held up their telescopes and viewing glasses Wednesday to watch Venus slide across the sun — a rare celestial phenomenon that will not happen again for more than 100 years. The spectacle began shortly after 2200 GMT Tuesday in parts of North America, Central America and…

New findings suggest misconceptions about ‘abortion pills’

A story in today’s New York Times suggests Republican anger over morning-after pills is misplaced, because of misconceptions about what they do. Pills like Plan B, Pam Belluck says, don’t stop fertilized eggs from attaching themselves to a woman’s uterus; instead, they delay ovulation, thus preventing eggs from interacting with…

WATCH LIVE: The transit of Venus

Australia and other countries in the Pacific have the opportunity to see the transit of Venus, when the planet passes between the Earth and the Sun. NASA is offering coverage of this rare event, which won’t occur again until 2117. Watch the live coverage from NASA, broadcast by UStream on…

Greenpeace maps way to saving Arctic from oil drilling

BERLIN — Greenpeace called here Tuesday for more use of renewable energy and greener cars to help protect the Arctic and other areas from being spoiled by oil drilling. The environmental group launched an “energy roadmap” for cutting oil demand by about 80 percent, especially for transport, by making cars…

Scientists fighting genetic diseases face ethical challenges

Aaron began to stand out at primary school. He was unlike other children in subtle ways that at times were hard to put a finger on. He couldn’t hold a pen properly. His balance was a little poor. He just seemed different from his classmates. There is no subtlety to…

Google+