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Sushi ‘tuna scrape’ blamed for U.S. salmonella outbreak

A ground fish product known as “tuna scrape,” imported to the United States from India, was blamed Monday for a salmonella outbreak that has sickened 116 people, US health authorities said. The illnesses are being linked to Nakaochi Scrape, or tuna backmeat, “which is specifically scraped off from the bones, and looks like…

Study: Anti-AIDS pill makes cash sense for some gays

Gay men who have five or more sex partners per year are part of a high-risk group that could benefit from a daily pill to ward off HIV, said a cost-benefit analysis by US researchers on Monday. The study by experts at Stanford University, published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, looked at…

Economics has failed us: but where are the fresh voices?

When the history of how a good crisis went to waste gets written up, it will surely contain a big chapter on the failure of our academic elites. Because just like the politicians, the taxpayer-funded intellectuals at our universities have missed the historic opportunities gifted to them by the financial…

Scientists get under skin of tattooed tipplers

PARIS — French scientists said Monday they have found evidence proving the stereotype that people who sport tattoos and piercings are heavier drinkers. Alcohol tests performed on nearly 2,000 young men and women frequenting bars in the west of France showed a strong correlation between body art and boozing, they…

U.S. greenhouse gases back up after decline

WASHINGTON — US emissions of greenhouse gases blamed for climate change rose in 2010, ending a brief downward turn as the world’s largest economy gradually recovers from recession, official data showed Monday. In a submission to the UN climate organization, the United States said that its greenhouse gas emissions grew…

Edible packaging is the ‘next big thing, but faces ‘psychological’ barriers

Pouring your milk then eating the bottle sounds less than tempting, but edible packaging is being touted as food technology’s next Big Thing. It’s not entirely new, of course. Heston Blumenthal’s been at it for years, wrapping palatable paper around packets of soup and urging us to eat salted caramels…

Researchers develop stem cells that attack and destroy HIV

Scientists from the University of California Los Angeles have found that genetically engineered human stem cells can suppress HIV in living mice, raising the hope for a breakthrough cure for HIV patients. In a recent study from the journal PLoS Pathogens, researchers wanted to go further than previous studies that…

No ice loss seen in major Himalayan glaciers

One of the world’s biggest glacier regions has so far resisted global warming that has ravaged mountain ice elsewhere, scientists reported on Sunday. For years, experts have debated the state of glaciers that smother nearly 20,000 square kilometres (7,700 sq. miles) of theKarakoram range in the western Himalayas. Straddling parts of China, Pakistan and India, the…

Tiny gene change affects brain size, IQ: scientists

PARIS — An international team of scientists said Sunday the largest brain study of its kind had found a gene linked to intelligence, a small piece in the puzzle as to why some people are smarter than others. A variant of this gene “can tilt the scales in favour of…

USDA warns two drugs for men may have sexual side effects

Two Merck drugs for treating male baldness and enlarged prostate will now carry extended labels to add more possible sexual side effects, US regulators said. The changes involve Propecia and Proscar, both of which contain the active ingredient finasteride, after patients reported additional adverse effects that were not apparent at…

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