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Study debunks myth that urine is sterile

A new study by researchers at Loyola University suggests that the common notion that human urine is sterile is not always true. A post at the science blog Lab Spaces says that tests have shown that certain bacteria commonly inhabit the bladders of some women, and that new approaches to…

Number of U.S. teen births lowest in 70 years

The number of new teenage mothers in the United States is at its lowest level in nearly 70 years but remains the highest of any major developed country, according to official figures released Tuesday. The current rate of 34.3 births per 1,000 women aged 15-19 is down 44 percent from…

Dental X-rays linked to brain tumors

People who get regular dental X-rays are more likely to suffer a common type of brain tumor, US researchers said on Tuesday, suggesting that yearly exams may not be best for most patients. The study in the US journal Cancer showed people diagnosed with meningioma who reported having a yearly…

Bat-killer fungus likely came from Europe: study

WASHINGTON — A deadly fungal disease that has killed millions of bats in North America is likely caused by a pathogen that came from Europe, international researchers said on Monday. White-nose syndrome (WNS), caused by a pathogen Geomyces destructans, was first observed to be killing bats in a cave in…

Scientists boycott academic journals to protest the high cost of paywalls

It began with a frustrated blogpost by a distinguished mathematician. Tim Gowers and his colleagues had been grumbling among themselves for several years about the rising costs of academic journals. They, like many other academics, were upset that the work produced by their peers, and funded largely by taxpayers, sat…

Study: Homophobic people likely repressing homosexual attraction

People who have negative feelings toward homosexuality often have secret attractions to the same sex — and are more likely to have grown up in households that forbid homosexual feelings, according to a recent study. A research team from the University of Rochester, the University of Essex, England, and the…

Obesity in pregnancy linked to autism

Mothers who are obese or have diabetes during pregnancy may be more likely to have babies with autism or other developmental delays, said a US study published on Monday. The findings “appear to raise serious public health concerns,” said the study in the journal Pediatrics, which comes amid an obesity…

Deep science drove discovery of Titanic

Today, anyone with a wad of cash and a sense of adventure can dive to the Titanic’s deepsea grave, but behind these tourist jaunts lies a long and daunting tale of scientific endeavour. After the Titanic sank on April 15, 1912, schemes proliferated for salvaging it — from packing the ship…

Intense heart attack pain could actually help patients, researchers say

Scientists say that when morphine is used to relieve pain it blocks the healing work of stem cells The intense pain of a heart attack could actually help patients, researchers have discovered. They have found that during an attack – when a blood clot blocks an artery that is serving…

Light brings back bad memories: study

Memory is one of the enduring mysteries of neuroscience. How does the brain form a memory, store it, and then retrieve it later on? After a century of research, some answers began to emerge. It is now widely believed that memory formation involves the strengthening of connections between a network…

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