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U.S. health authorities warn against ‘inhalable caffeine’

US health authorities on Tuesday issued a warning to the maker of a new inhalable caffeine product sold in the United States and France, citing mislabeling and safety concerns. “The Food and Drug Administration reviewed your website at www.aeroshots.com in February 2012 and has determined that the product AeroShot is…

DARPA’s ‘robot cheetah’ breaks speed record

The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on Monday announced that they had set a new speed record for legged robots. A press advisory from DARPA’s Maximum Mobility and Manipulation (M3) project said that their so-called “Cheetah” had reached speeds of up to 18 miles per hour on a…

Sleepiness affects pilots, train operators on job: poll

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Many people have fought the urge to fall asleep during a boring meeting or the mid-afternoon slump but the problem seems to be more prevalent among airline pilots and train operators. About a quarter of pilots and 23 percent of train operators questioned in a National…

Scientist makes violin strings from spider silk

A Japanese scientist said he has made violin strings out of spider silkand claims that — in the right hands — they produce a beautiful sound. Thousands of the tiny strands can be wound together to produce a strong but flexible string that is perfect for the instrument, saidShigeyoshi Osaki, professor of polymer…

Cuba to test new AIDS vaccine on humans

Cuba’s top biotech teams have successfully tested a new AIDS vaccine on mice, and are ready to soon begin human testing, a leading researcher told a biotechnology conference in Havana on Monday. “The new AIDS trial vaccine already was tested successfully (on mice) and now we are preparing a very small, tightly controlled phase…

Small dams, big impact on Mekong River fish: study

WASHINGTON — Plans to build hydropower dams along small branches of southeast Asia’s longest river could have a devastating impact on millions of people who rely on the world’s largest inland fishery, scientists said Monday. Plenty of attention has focused on plans to develop 11 big dams along the main…

On-screen boozing tied to kids’ binge drinking

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – How much drinking kids and teens had seen in recent movies was linked to the chances they overdid it on alcohol themselves in a new study from six European countries. Researchers said that movies and television may make kids see drinking as mature and cool,…

Robotic surgeries costlier but safer: study

(Reuters) – Patients who have robot-assisted surgeries on their kidneys or prostate have shorter hospital stays and a lower risk of having a blood transfusion or dying — but the bill is significantly higher, a study found. The analysis, which appeared in the Journal of Urology, compared increasingly common robotic…

Taking vitamin E linked to osteoporosis

Japanese scientists say they have found a link between consumption of vitamin E and the degenerative bone condition osteoporosis, in a study likely to shed new light on the use of supplements. Researchers found that giving mice increased doses of the vitamin to a level similar to that found in…

Joint action on HIV and TB saved 900,000 lives: WHO

LONDON (Reuters) – An estimated 910,000 lives were saved worldwide over six years thanks to better collaboration between health services to protect people with the AIDS virus from tuberculosis, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Friday. The WHO said there had been a sharp rise in the numbers of…

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