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U.S. joins effort to draw up space ‘code of conduct’

WASHINGTON — The United States pledged Tuesday to join an EU-led effort to develop a space “code of conduct” that would set out rules for orbiting spacecraft and for mitigating the growing problem of debris. “The long-term sustainability of our space environment is at serious risk from space debris and…

German researchers pave way to cheaper malaria drug

German researchers announced Tuesday they had discovered a process to make the most effective anti-malaria drug cheaper and easier to produce in large life-saving quantities. The breakthrough offers hope to the more than 200 million malaria sufferers worldwide, especially in poor countries, by makingartemisinin more affordable, the Max Planck Society said. “There is an…

Canada urged to conceal fetal sex over abortion fears

An editorial in a major Canadian medical journal urges doctors to conceal the gender of a fetus from all pregnant women until 30 weeks to prevent sex-selective abortion by Asian immigrants. A separate article in the same issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal warns that Canada has become “a haven for parents who would terminate female fetuses…

Study faults research linking hormone therapy to cancer

A landmark investigation which found that hormone treatment for the menopause boosts the risk of breast cancer is riddled with flaws, a new study published on Monday alleges. The so-called Million Women Study (MWS) unleashed headlines when it was first published in 2003. Based on questionnaires returned by more than a million…

Europe’s ‘Big Bang’ observatory completes cosmic survey

PARIS — A 900-million-dollar orbital observatory has completed the biggest-ever search for remnants of the “Big Bang” that created the Universe, the European Space Agency said on Monday. The main instrument on the Planck observatory failed on Saturday when — as expected — it ran out of coolant, ending a…

Fewer kids being hospitalized for near-drowning

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Half as many kids are sent to the hospital after almost drowning than were two decades ago, according to a new study that suggests public health education campaigns about drowning risks may be working. Researchers found that hospitalization rates dropped in both boys and girls,…

Carbon dioxide affecting fish brains: study

Rising human carbon dioxide emissions may be affecting the brains and central nervous systems of sea fish, with serious consequences for their survival, according to new research. Carbon dioxide concentrations predicted to occur in the ocean by the end of this century will interfere with fishes’ ability to hear, smell,…

Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

CAIRO — Swiss archaeologists have discovered the tomb of a female singer dating back almost 3,000 years in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, Antiquities Minister Mohammed Ibrahim said on Sunday. The rare find was made accidentally by a team from Switzerland’s Basel University headed by Elena Pauline-Grothe and Susanne Bickel…

Russia Mars probe ‘crashes into Pacific Ocean’: military

Russia believes fragments of its Phobos-Grunt probe which spiralled back to Earth after failing to head on a mission to Mars crashed Sunday into the Pacific Ocean, a spokesman for its space forces said. “According to information from mission control of the space forces, the fragments of Phobos Grunt should have fallen into the Pacific Ocean…

Study shows humans were skilled fishermen 42,000 years ago

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Fish hooks and fishbones dating back 42,000 years found in a cave in East Timor suggest that humans were capable of skilled, deep-sea fishing 30,000 years earlier than previously thought, researchers in Australia and Japan said on Friday. The artifacts — nearly 39,000 fishbones and three…

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