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Trio win Nobel Physics Prize for supernovae research

Researchers Saul Perlmutter and Adam Riess of the United States and US-Australian Brian Schmidt won the 2011 Nobel Physics PrizeTuesday for their research on supernovae, the Nobel jury said. “They have studied several dozen exploding stars, called supernovae, and discovered that the universe is expanding at an ever-accelerating rate,” it said, adding that their discovery had…

Virus to blame for rise in throat cancer: study

(Reuters) – Cancer of the back of the mouth and throat is on the rise, primarily because of more cases stemming from a viral infection called human papillomavirus (HPV), according to a U.S. study. The number of people who were diagnosed with HPV-related oral cancer in 2004 was triple the…

Female hormonal contraception linked to higher HIV risk

PARIS — Women who use hormonal birth control are roughly twice as likely to become infected with HIV or pass on the AIDS virus to their partner, according to a study published on Tuesday. The research was carried out among 3,790 heterosexual couples in Africa where one partner had the…

Nobel researcher was a subject of his own discovery

LONDON/CHICAGO (Reuters) – Ralph Steinman proved the importance of his Nobel prize-winning research in a most personal way, using his own discoveries to fight the pancreatic cancer that eventually killed him just days before the award was announced. In the future, millions more people around the world are likely to…

‘Invisible key’ invented by Taiwan scientists

A team of Taiwanese researchers have developed an “invisible key” technology which allows users to unlock their doors by means of simple hand gestures, the head of the team said Monday. “In the future, you won’t have to worry about losing or forgetting your keys,” said Tsai Yao-pin, who teaches…

In Chile desert, huge telescope begins galaxy probe

A powerful telescope affording a view of the universe unmatched by most ground-based observatories gazed onto distant galaxies for the first time Monday from deep in Chile’s Atacama desert. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, a joint project between Canada, Chile, the European Union, Japan, Taiwan and the United States, officially…

Toxic mining disasters ‘loom in eastern Europe’

Toxic mining disasters loom in eastern Europe as the European Union has failed to pass legislation a year after Hungary’s lethal toxic mud spill, an environmentalist group said on Monday. “Hungary has let its presidency of the EU pass without taking any action to defuse further ticking time bombs in Central and Eastern Europe,” said Gabor Figeczky, the head…

Immune system researchers win Nobel Medicine Prize

Three scientists shared the Nobel Medicine Prize on Monday for their ground-breaking work on the immune system which the jury said opened up new prospects for curing cancer and other diseases. The laureates are Bruce Beutler of the United States, Jules Hoffmann of Luxembourg and Ralph Steinman of Canada. “This year’s Nobel laureates have revolutionised our understanding of the immune system by…

Act now to diversify crops at risk, say scientists

Farm chiefs have a narrowing chance to diversify vital crops at rising threat from drought, flood and pests brought by climate change, food researchers warned on Monday. The world’s nearly seven billion people are massively dependent on a dozen or so crops that, thanks to modern agriculture, are intensively cultivated…

China activist defies officials in fight to save lake

Prominent environmental activist Wu Lihong plunges his hands into a thick layer of toxic green scum and brown foam floating on one of China’s biggest freshwater lakes. Despite a two-decade battle to clean up the once-scenic Taihu Lake that earned him three years in jail, Wu says the water still…

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