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WHO warns HIV ‘exploding’ among gay men, urges preventive drugs

HIV infections are rising among gay men in many parts of the world, the World Health Organization warned Friday, urging all men who have sex with men to take antiretroviral drugs to prevent infection. “We are seeing exploding epidemics,” warned Gottfried Hirnschall, who heads WHO’s HIV department. Infection rates are…

Citizen scientists out of options to rescue old NASA satellite

By Irene Klotz CAPE CANAVERAL Fla. (Reuters) – A valiant effort to put a defunct NASA science satellite back to work came to a disappointing end this week after the 36-year-old spacecraft’s propulsion system failed, project organizers said. An ad hoc team of engineers and scientists won permission from NASA…

Bee-harming ‘neonicotinoid’ pesticides also hurt bird populations: study

Already suspected of killing bees, so-called “neonic” pesticides also affect bird populations, possibly by eliminating the insects they feed upon, a Dutch study said on Wednesday. The new paper comes weeks after an international panel of 29 experts found that birds, butterflies, worms and fish were being harmed by neonicotinoid…

Privately funded ‘LightSail’ solar spacecraft to launch atop a SpaceX rocket in 2016

A tiny spacecraft designed to sail by the power of the sun is scheduled to launch atop a SpaceX rocket in 2016, a leading US space enthusiast said Wednesday. The Planetary Society’s LightSail, an unmanned satellite-like craft known as a solar sail, aims to reach orbit aboard a SpaceX Falcon…

Mavleg’s magic: Can magnetically levitating trains run at 3,000km/h?

By Roger Goodall, Loughborough University Trains that use magnets to levitate above the tracks might sound like something from Back to the Future, but the concept of magnetic levitation has been around for many years. Maglev trains, which use this technology, were first developed in the 1960s and many different…

U.S. weather forecaster still sees 70 percent chance of summer El Nino

(Reuters) – The U.S. weather forecaster maintained its outlook for the El Nino weather phenomenon in its monthly update on Thursday, pegging the chances of the weather pattern striking during the Northern Hemisphere summer at 70 percent. The Climate Prediction Center, an agency of the National Weather Service, said there…

Does it feel hot to you now? See what 1,001 cities’ summers will be like by 2100

Originally published at Climate Central If it feels hot to you now in the dog days of this summer, imagine a time when summertime Boston starts feeling like Miami and even Montana sizzles. Thanks to climate change, that day is coming by the end of the century, making it harder…

Astronomers discover massive amount of missing ultraviolet light

The light at the heart of this mystery is comprised of highly energetic UV photons that can convert electrically neutral hydrogen atoms into charged ions, the study authors explained. …

Almost anyone can hitchhike into space with a nanosatellite

Earlier this year, the Russian Federal Space Agency received a hand-luggage-sized delivery from the UK. It came with a request to launch the contents aboard a rocket, along with the Russian three-tonne meteorological satellite. The tiny British package will be launched into space today and it contains a nanosatellite, called…

Outburst from second brightest star modeled in 3D

In the mid-1800s a massive eruption occurred in the binary Eta Carinae, emitting 10 times the sun’s mass and becoming the second brightest star in the sky. Astronomers have developed a high-resolution 3D model of the expanding cloud produced by the outburst, according to NASA. …

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