Quantcast
Home » Archives » Science (Page 7)

Charred bones unearthed in cave suggest Neanderthals ate barbecued pigeon

Neanderthals snacked on pigeons that they had toasted on open fires, according to researchers, adding to the menu of foods known to be eaten by our closest ancient relatives. Leftovers of Neanderthal feasts were discovered in sediments that built up over millennia in the huge Gorham’s Cave on the east…

New gene mutation ‘PALB2′ found to raise breast cancer risk

A newly discovered gene mutation significantly raises a woman’s risk of breast cancer and may be considered the third such inherited gene flaw known to science, researchers said Wednesday. Women with mutations in the PALB2 gene face a one in three chance of getting breast cancer by age 70, said…

Laquintasaura venezuelae: This early dinosaur was turkey-sized, social, and a vegetarian

The forerunner of dinosaurs like three-horned Triceratops was a bird-hipped creature the size of a turkey that lived in herds in South America and liked to munch on ferns, scientists said Wednesday. Laquintasaura venezuelae, named after the country in which it was discovered, lived 201 million years ago in the…

State-of-the-art ALMA telescope in Chile sizes up Pluto’s orbit

Scientists using a high-powered telescope in Chile have been able to measure Pluto’s orbit precisely, to help with navigation as a US probe nears the planet in 2015. This will help NASA’s New Horizons craft home in on its target, according to scientists at the US National Radio Astronomy Observatory,…

This interactive graph shows how many extremely hot days your city will see in the future

Originally published at Climate Central Global temperatures are rising, but nothing brings global warming home to people like a really hot summer day — those few days a year when it actually feels like the planet is boiling over. But what if those rare sweltering days, over 90° or 100°F,…

See the power plants most vulnerable to flooding

Originally published at Climate Central It doesn’t take rising seas for electric power plants and other energy infrastructure in the U.S. to flood. Major 100-year floods can do that without the help of climate change. The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s new mapping tool announced Wednesday shows how such a flood could drown some of the nation’s…

Agricultural revolution 10,000 years ago was key to the rise of ancient despots

By Simon Powers, University of Lausanne For hundreds of thousands of years humans lived in hunter-gatherer societies, eating wild plants and animals. Inequality in these groups is thought to have been very low, with evidence suggesting food and other resources were shared equally between all individuals. In fact, in the…

Sweden reveals world’s first garment made entirely from recycled cotton

In 2010, the world consumed a record 69.7m tonnes of clothes. That’s up from 47.4m tonnes just 10 years earlier, according to statistics from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). The unwieldy figures translate to approximately 10kg of clothes per person in 2013, up from 6.7kg 10 years…

Space probe Rosetta makes historic rendezvous with comet after 10-year chase

The space probe Rosetta on Wednesday made a historic rendezvous with a comet, climaxing a 10-year, six billion-kilometre (3.7-billion-mile) chase through the Solar System, the European Space Agency (ESA) said. “We’re at the comet,” declared Rosetta’s flight operations manager, Sylvain Lodiot. It is the first time that a spacecraft has…

Experimental anti-Ebola drug used to treat aid workers could take months to produce

Washington (AFP) – An experimental drug given to two American patients with Ebola is made from tobacco leaves and is hard to produce on a large scale, a leading U.S. doctor said Tuesday. Known as ZMapp, the serum consists of three antibodies manufactured in modified tobacco leaves, which take weeks…

Google+