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Humans to blame for much of recent glacier melt

Originally published at Climate Central From Alaska to the Alps, photos of today’s diminished glaciers contrasted with grainy black-and-white images of their former, more massive states are some of the most widely used examples of the impact of human-caused climate change, with their melt threatening water supplies, enhancing sea level rise, and posing…

Richard Dawkins: I don’t mind being disliked by complete idiots, like creationists

As a 13-year-old Richard Dawkins would fantasise about praying at an altar then seeing an angel dramatically appear in a burst of white light. Yes, one of the world’s most strident atheists communed with God – “but God never actually did get through to me for some reason”. Dawkins’ religious…

Study concludes Egyptian mummification is 1,500 years older than was thought

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) – It has long been known that the practice of mummification of the dead in ancient Egypt – fundamental to that civilization’s belief in eternal life – was old, but only now are researchers unwrapping the mystery of just how long ago it began. Researchers…

Ancient flying reptile’s head crest looked like a yacht’s sail

By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) – A flying reptile whose head was topped with a big bony crest shaped like the sail of a yacht swooped through the skies over Brazil roughly 90 million years ago. Scientists announced on Wednesday the remarkable discovery of about 50 fossilized skeletons of a…

Researchers: Two out of five U.S. young adults at risk of developing diabetes

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Two out of five U.S. adults born between 2000 and 2011 are expected to develop type 2 diabetes at some point in their life, which is double the rate for men and some 50 percent higher for women born two decades earlier, according to a new…

Maryam Mirzakhani of Iran becomes first woman to win Nobel Prize of mathematics

An Iranian-born mathematician has become the first woman to win a prestigious Fields Medal, widely viewed as the Nobel Prize of mathematics. Maryam Mirzakhani, a Harvard-educated mathematician and professor at Stanford University in California, was one of four winners announced by the International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) at its conference…

Vaccination could halt ‘troubling’ spike in whooping cough cases: Idaho health officials

Idaho health officials on Tuesday urged vaccination to combat what they said was an alarming rise this year in the number of cases of whooping cough, which has killed an infant and afflicted 240 other state residents since January. The 241 cases of whooping cough, or pertussis, reported in Idaho…

Scientist tells Neil deGrasse Tyson how she stumped New York Times’ sexist reporting

The head of the imaging team for the Cassini mission to Saturn, Carolyn Porco, told astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson that New York Times editors asked a reporter to delve into her love life while working on a profile focusing on her career. “[The reporter] submits it to her editors and…

California has hottest start to year while Midwest chills

Originally published at Climate Central The heat records keep falling for California. The state has had its hottest first seven months of the year, crushing the previous mark. Neighboring states have also baked, though not quite at record levels, helping contribute to both the spread of drought and large wildfires. At…

SETI Institute: We could find alien life, but politicians don’t have the will

By Seth Shostak, SETI Institute While alien life can be seen nightly on television and in the movies, it has never been seen in space. Not so much as a microbe, dead or alive, let alone a wrinkle-faced Klingon. Despite this lack of protoplasmic presence, there are many researchers –…

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