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CIA orchestrated fake vaccinations to collect bin Laden DNA

Pakistani officials have detained a doctor who the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) paid to secretly collect DNA samples from Osama bin Laden’s compound, a report said Monday. Prior to the raid that killed the al Qaeda chief on May 2, the CIA recruited Shakil Afridi, a doctor who works…

New York police deny IMF ex-chief Strauss-Kahn DNA report

NEW YORK (AFP) – New York police on Tuesday denied reports of finding DNA traces from ex-IMF chief Dominique Strauss-Kahn on the clothes of a hotel maid, saying investigators had so far given “no result and no information” about the test results. DNA was found on the shirt of the…

US serial killer feared loose after 8 bodies found

NEW YORK (AFP) – The discovery of eight bodies buried on a Long Island beach in the northeastern state of New York has raised suspicions here there is a serial killer on the loose. The remains of four prostitutes, aged 22 to 27, who worked through online ads posted on…

Lost in evolution: a hairy penis, a tiny brain

PARIS – Some defining human traits — a penis bereft of the stiff sensory hairs common to many male mammals, a bulging brain — come less from new genes than genetic material lost through evolution, according to a study published Thursday. The findings suggest a new way of thinking about…

Texas man cleared of rape after 24 years in jail

CHICAGO — A Texas man was cleared of rape charges Thursday after serving more than 24 years in jail, court officials said. Larry Sims, 60, was convicted of rape in October 1986. But DNA evidence — which remained untested until recently — undermined the testimony of his accuser. “We’ve officially…

Japanese man joins the ranks of sequenced genomes

A Japanese man has joined the elite club of humans whose genetic code has been fully sequenced, according to research unveiled on Sunday. The unnamed male gave a sample of DNA which has been unravelled to show all three billion base pairs, or “letters” in the double-helix code for life.…

Police could soon be using hand germs to trace criminals

WASHINGTON — Forensic scientists could soon use hand germs to help identify criminals and victims, a study said Monday. Researchers led by Noah Fierer of the University of Colorado at Boulder swabbed individual keys on three personal computer keyboards, extracted bacterial DNA from the swabs and compared the results with…

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