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Supreme Court: Police need a warrant before searching a suspect’s cell phone

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that police officers usually need a warrant before they can search an arrested suspect’s cellphone. The court said on a 9-0 vote in an opinion written by Chief Justice John Roberts that the right of police to…

Supreme Court declines to revive New Jersey sports betting law

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) – New Jersey’s attempt to introduce licensed sports betting has failed, with the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday leaving intact a lower court ruling that said a federal law did not allow it. The high court declined appeals filed by the state and its supporters…

Supreme Court leaves intact jury verdicts against big tobacco

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a series of appeals filed mainly by R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co seeking to overturn Florida court rulings worth more than $70 million in favor of customers who sued over injuries associated with smoking. By turning…

Supreme Court rules that inmate over threshold IQ can still be too impaired to execute

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday threw out a death sentence for a Florida man in a decision that found the state’s method for assessing whether defendants are mentally disabled was unconstitutional. The court ruled on a 5-4 vote, with Justice Anthony Kennedy writing…

Fox News reporter Jana Winter won’t have to testify in Colorado theater shooting case

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear an appeal by a man facing trial for a high-profile mass shooting at a Colorado movie theater in 2012 over his lawyers’ attempt to force a Fox News reporter to testify. The court’s refusal to…

Supreme Court rules Christian prayers at town meetings are constitutional

By Lawrence Hurley WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court ruled on Monday that a town in New York state did not violate the U.S. Constitution’s ban on government endorsement of religion by allowing prayers before its monthly meetings. In a decision that is likely to guide how local governments…

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