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Supreme Court rules John Ashcroft did not misuse power to arrest terror witness

The Supreme Court on Tuesday unanimously threw out a lawsuit accusing former Attorney General John Ashcroft of misusing his power by jailing a supposed terrorism witness in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks. In the case Ashcroft v. al Kidd, the highest court in the nation ruled (PDF)…

Giffords may lose seat under Arizona rules: report

Nine days after sustaining a gunshot wound to the head, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-AZ) is once again able to smile, doctors reported Monday, but the three-term representative could find herself out of the US House, thanks to a little-used Arizona regulation. According to a state statute unearthed by the Washington…

Supreme Court ruling may not help Democrats targeted by Bush US Attorneys

Decision might apply if cases are taken up by the Supreme Court on appeal; lawyers have mixed reactions A unanimous Supreme Court ruling last Thursday, which set aside the conviction of former Enron CEO Jeffrey Skilling on a charge of honest-services wire fraud, may not help the cause of either…

Supreme Court weakens key anti-corruption law

Two high-profile prosecutions criticized; Conrad Black’s fraud conviction vacated; Part of Enron boss’s conviction vacated WASHINGTON — The US Supreme Court Thursday set aside part of Enron boss Jeffrey Skilling’s fraud conviction, saying it was “flawed” and unconstitutional. “Because the indictment alleged three objects of the conspiracy, honest-services wire fraud,…

Supreme Court ruling makes ‘it a crime to work for peace and human rights’: CCR

Group: Former President Carter could be prosecuted for monitoring fair elections in Lebanon The US Supreme Court endorsed Monday a broad reading of the law criminalizing “material support” to terrorism, a statute that critics argue targets legitimate free speech. In a six to three vote, the highest US court sided…

Report: Prosecutors charging DNA evidence with crimes

In their effort to beat the statutes of limitations that prevent people from being charged with a crime after a certain amount of time has passed, prosecutors in some parts of the US are trying a new tactic: They’re charging half-eaten food, saliva-crusted glasses or other inanimate objects with the…

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