Quantcast
Connect with us

In a first, Obama tweets for Haiti

Published

on

US President Barack Obama ‘tweeted’ his very first message on Monday, joining the millions who have used the Twitter micro-blogging site as a vital information vehicle for the Haiti disaster.

The president and First Lady Michelle Obama visited an unadorned office in the American Red Cross headquarters serving as a disaster operations center, and lent encouragement to staff and volunteers helping coordinate humanitarian aid activity in earthquake-devastated Haiti.

“We’re just here to say ‘thank you’ for the great work you’re doing,” Obama said as he entered the operations center with American Red Cross board chairwoman Bonnie McElveen-Hunter.

As he moved about the room, where large maps of Port-au-Prince were tacked to the walls, he stopped at a media team desk and hit the “Send” button on a message that had just been typed on Twitter: “President Obama and the First Lady are here visiting our disaster operation center right now.”

This was followed by: “President Obama pushed the button on the last tweet. It was his first ever tweet!”

ADVERTISEMENT

During his presidential bid in 2007 and 2008, Obama’s team harnessed the power of the Internet to raise record funding for his campaign.

His administration, too, has been praised for its tech-savvy use of the web.

It has included live streams of the president’s speeches onto social networking sites like Facebook, and the White House has its own Twitter account.

ADVERTISEMENT

But apparently Obama himself had yet to personally embrace the phenomenon until now.

The Internet, especially Twitter and social networking sites, have been instrumental in helping people locate relatives in Haiti or plead for help to find loved ones, post pictures or links to video from the earthquake zone.

The web has also been a spectacular emergency fund-raising tool.

ADVERTISEMENT

More than 22 million dollars for Haiti’s earthquake survivors has been collected by text-messaging a Red Cross appeal in the United States, the State Department said Monday in its own Twitter message.


Report typos and corrections to [email protected].

Send confidential news tips to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump’s racism is ‘disqualifying’ for him to remain as president: former White House lawyer

Published

on

Former acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal explained on MSNBC on Thursday why he viewed President Donald Trump's racist attacks on four women of color in Congress as disqualifying.

Anchor Brian Williams read a quote from Susan Glasser of The New Yorker.

"Half of the country is appalled but not really sure how to combat him; the other half is cheering, or at least averting its gaze. This is what a political civil war looks like, with words, for now, as weapons," Glasser wrote.

Continue Reading

Facebook

Lawrence O’Donnell reports on the growing movement for the impeachment of President Donald Trump

Published

on

Anchor Lawrence O'Donnell reported on the growing movement for the impeachment of President Donald Trump during Thursday evening's "The Last Word" on MSNBC.

"The House of Representatives conducted a symbolic vote on a hastily written impeachment resolution by Democratic Congressman Al Green in reaction to the president’s tweeted comments that the House of Representatives voted to condemn as racist," O'Donnell reported. "The impeachment resolution had nothing to do with the [Robert] Mueller investigation and referred only to the president being unfit for office because of the language that he has used recently about members of Congress and immigrants and asylum seekers."

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Video proves how far the Trump’s GOP has gone from the era of Ronald Reagan and HW Bush

Published

on

The immigration policies of Donald Trump’s presidency would have no room for his GOP predecessors Ronald Reagan or George H.W. Bush—who both embraced work visas, family unification, easy border crossings and a better relationship with Mexico.

That counterpoint can be seen in a very short video clip from the 1980 presidential election where Reagan and Bush—who became Reagan’s vice president for two terms before winning the presidency in 1988—were asked about immigration at a campaign debate in Texas. Their responses show just how far to the right the Republican Party’s current leader, President Trump, and voters who have not left the GOP to become self-described political independents, have moved on immigration.

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

Join Me. Try Raw Story Investigates for $1. Invest in Journalism. Escape Ads.
close-image