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Comcast court victory a major setback to ‘Net Neutrality’ efforts

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A US appeals court dealt a major setback on Tuesday to the efforts of US goverment regulators to force Internet service providers to treat all Web traffic equally.

The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled in favor of broadband provider Comcast Corp. in a case seen as a test of the authority of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to enforce “net neutrality.”

Net neutrality is the principle that ISPs provide the same speed and level of service to all Web users, regardless of size.

Net neutrality would prevent ISPs, for example, from blocking or slowing bandwidth-hogging Web traffic such as streaming video or other applications that put a strain on their networks or from charging different rates to users.

The three-judge appeals court ruled in the Comcast case that the FCC does not have the legal authority to regulate the network management practices of ISPs.

The judges said the FCC had failed to demonstrate it has the authority to prevent Comcast from interfering with the use by its customers of peer-to-peer networking applications, which consume large amounts of bandwidth.

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The case ended up in court after two advocacy organizations, Free Press and Public Knowledge, challenged Comcast’s 2007 blocking of peer-to-peer programs by some customers and the FCC issued an order barring the practice.

During his White House campaign, President Barack Obama came out strongly in favor of net neutrality, which is backed by companies such as Google, Amazon, Yahoo!, eBay and consumer advocacy groups, but opposed by telecommunications, wireless and cable companies.

Under its new chairman, Julius Genachowski, the FCC has begun drafting rules that would require ISPs to protect net neutrality.

The draft proposed rules would allow broadband Internet providers to conduct “reasonable network management” and block spam, unlawful content such as child pornography and files that infringe copyright.

But they would not be allowed to discriminate against lawful content.

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GOP gangs up on AOC: Top Republican demands Ocasio-Cortez apologize to the entire world – she refuses

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The Republican machine is in fifth gear right now, speeding to attack one of their top Democratic targets: Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).

At issue, a video the New York Democrat recorded in which she calls the migrant detention camps on the U.S. Southern border "concentration camps."

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Economist mocks GOP for trying to pin racism on Democrats — after telling a harrowing story about anti-black economic envy

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Economist Julianne Malveaux explained to the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday that there was a time in the United States where black Americans were actually closing the wealth gap with white Americans -- until white Americans rioted and burned their property.

During her testimony at a hearing on reparations, Malveaux recounted the horrific story of the destruction of "Black Wall Street," which was a location in Tulsa, Oklahoma that was known for its high concentration of black-owned businesses and black wealth.

The area's prosperity came to an end in 1921 when white Tulsa residents used baseless accusation of a black man sexually assaulting a white woman as a justification to chase out all black residents and set fire to their neighborhoods. Hundreds of black residents were killed in the riots and the majority fled the city.

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MSNBC’s Stephanie Ruhle unloads on Democrats for letting Hope Hicks testify behind closed doors

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MSNBC host Stephanie Ruhle questioned the purpose of Wednesday’s hearing with former White House director of communications Hope Hicks.

Hope Hicks testified Wednesday during a closed-door hearing before the House Judiciary Committee -- where she reportedly refused to answer many questions.

“Let’s be honest, why did Democrats think this was a huge break? Why did they think that Hope Hicks was going to sing like a bird?” Ruhle asked MSNBC national security analyst Ken Dilanian.

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