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Newsweek ‘covers up’ secret zombie invasion headlines

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Zombies beat multicolored unicorns any day of the week.

At his Twitter account, author/critic Douglas Wolk tweeted on Monday, “Want your day made? Go to newsweek.com and do the Konami code: up up down down left right left right B A enter.”

At The New York Times Media Decoder blog, Derrick Henry writes, “Programmers for Newsweek’s Web site, Newsweek.com, have apparently placed a hidden joke on the magazine’s home page for readers who enter a special keyboard combination, triggering a page of headlines purporting to provide coverage of an uprising by the undead.”

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The lead headline, “Zombies Attack!” was followed by a summary informing readers that large portions of the East Coast had been invaded by the undead rising from their graves. Residents were advised to barricade themselves and await further instructions. Other headlines suggested that someone named Patient Zero was to blame for the invasion and that people battling zombies should aim for the head.

Readers were also urged to contribute their reports. “Not everybody reacts the same to the undead,” the site said. “If you, or a loved one, has encountered a zombie please share your experiences.”

“The zombies invaded over the weekend, and you didn’t even know it,” joked Tony Deconinck at AOL News.

Suspicion lies on Mike Robinson, whose name was displayed prominently in the author byline of the page and who is an application developer for Newsweek, but the actual source of the secret code is yet to be revealed.

AOL News spoke with Nick Summers, who first tweeted the surprise last Friday after receiving an e-mail that alerted him to the hidden Easter egg.

“A couple weeks ago, Newsweek relaunched a website redesign, new CMS, a new approach to how we promote our magazine content,” said Summers. “It was a soup-to-nuts relaunch of the site. When you do something that major, it gives an opportunity for someone to sneak in a bit of code.”

An information security blog took a look at the secret code and found it buried in a file of Javascript libraries used by the Newsweek website.

As for those “multicolored unicorns.”

Last year, videogame blog Kotaku reported, “Sports fans with a taste for glittery unicorns should run, not walk, to ESPN.com and remember their Konami Code, because it appears that some soon to be possibly unemployed web designer is having a laugh.”

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As a couple of unicorn-loving tipsters with a thirst for sporting news have informed us, inputting the infamous Konami cheat code (up, up, down, down, left, right, left, right, B, A, enter) will infest the official ESPN web site with mystical ponies. And they’ll keep spawning if you keep clicking.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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WATCH: John Oliver exposes Trump’s lies about vote-by-mail — and the Fox News ‘cult’ claiming the election is already ‘rigged’

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"Last Week Tonight" host John Oliver's main story Sunday refuted President Donald Trump's latest crusade against vote-by-mail. Trump announced on Twitter that the more people who vote in an election, the more Republicans tend to lose. So, he wants fewer people to have access to the ballot in November, even if people are too scared to go out during the coronavirus crisis.

Oliver called out Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R-MO), who outright told people not to vote if they were too afraid to vote in the local elections next week.

"Well, hold on there," Oliver interjected. "Voting is a right. It has to be easy to understand and accessible to anyone."

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John Oliver rips Fox News’ Tucker Carlson for urging ‘order’ from people of color — but never demanding it of police

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John Oliver opened his Sunday show, shredding Fox News host Tucker Carlson for uring "order" among protesters, but refusing to urge "order" to police and "wannabe police" who can't stop killing people.

It's a lot, Oliver explained. "How these protests are a response to a legacy of police misconduct, both in Minneapolis and the nation at large and how that misconduct is, itself, built on a legacy of white supremacy that prioritizes the comfort of white Americans over the safety of people of color."

While some of it is complicated, Oliver conceded, most of it is "all too clear."

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Cars set on fire blocks from White House as DC protests turn violent

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The Washington, D.C. protests turned violent as the city approached the 11 p.m. curfew the mayor instituted Sunday afternoon.

The policy of D.C. police is that when they are attacked, they advance forward. So, when fireworks were fired, the line of officers began pushing the protesters back further from the White House. Behind the line of police officers also stand a line of National Guard troops that President Donald Trump has demanded stand watch in the city.

Lights that normally shine on the White House have also been turned off, reporters revealed.

https://twitter.com/markknoller/status/1267291138655956992

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