Quantcast
Connect with us

From start, Bush team focused on war with Iraq: documents

Published

on

Former president George W. Bush’s advisers focused on toppling Saddam Hussein’s regime as soon as he took office and discussed how to justify a war in Iraq shortly after invading Afghanistan in 2001, official documents showed Wednesday.

A few hours after the September 11 attacks in 2001, then defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld spoke of attacking Iraq as well as Osama bin Laden, according to notes of a meeting on that day, newly declassified papers show.

ADVERTISEMENT

Rumsfeld told a Pentagon lawyer to go to his deputy to get “support” showing a supposed link between the Iraqi regime and Al-Qaeda’s founder, according to the papers posted by the Washington-based National Security Archive, an independent research institute.

The US government has since acknowledged that Saddam’s regime had no role in the 9/11 attacks.

In June and July of 2001, senior administration officials seized on intercepted aluminum tubes as proof that Iraq was pursuing nuclear weapons, even before a preliminary assessment of the tubes, according to two State Department memos to then secretary of state Colin Powell.

One memo states the US government’s interest in “publicizing the interdiction to our advantage” and “getting the right story out” about the tubes, which were soon found to have no nuclear connection.

Confronting Iraq was also the focus of a July 2001 memo to the national security adviser at the time, Condoleezza Rice, with Rumsfeld urging a high-level meeting on policy towards Baghdad.

ADVERTISEMENT

Voicing concern that sanctions were proving a failure and that Iraq’s air defenses were improving, Rumsfeld warned: “Within a few years the US will undoubtedly have to confront a Saddam armed with nuclear weapons.”

Forecasting an optimistic outcome far from the result the Iraq war produced, Rumsfeld said that Washington’s image in the region and the world would benefit from toppling Saddam.

“If Saddam’s regime were ousted, we would have a much-improved position in the region and elsewhere,” he wrote. “A major success in Iraq would enhance US credibility and influence throughout the region.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Another document shows Rumsfeld discussing war plans for Iraq just two months after the 2001 US invasion of Afghanistan.

In a meeting with the then head of US Central Command, General Tommy Franks, the defense chief tells him to ready forces for the “decapitation” of the Iraqi regime.

ADVERTISEMENT

In talking points dated November 27, Rumsfeld lists possible triggers the Bush administration could use to start a war, including Iraqi military action against the US-protected enclave in northern Iraq, discovery of ties between Saddam and 9/11 or recent anthrax attacks and disputes with UN weapons inspections.

In a December 18, 2001 memo, the State Department’s analytical unit warns that France and Germany will likely oppose an invasion of Iraq without concrete proof that Baghdad was behind the 9/11 attacks.

The same memo warns that British support for a US war would come at a political cost for the prime minister, Tony Blair, and could trigger a backlash from the country’s Muslim population.

ADVERTISEMENT

Backing the US war “could bring a radicalization of British Muslims, the great majority of whom opposed the September 11 attacks but are increasingly restive about what they see as an anti-Islamic campaign,” the memo states.

The documents posted Wednesday were released under a Freedom of Information request.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Nevada debate highlights: The dance of women leaders and limited economic opportunity

Published

on

Editor’s note: Six Democratic candidates met on the debate stage in Las Vegas on Feb. 19, discussing health care, immigration, billionaires and economic equality – as well as the name of the president of Mexico. We asked two scholars to pick out what they viewed as the night’s biggest moments as Nevada Democrats get ready for their caucuses on Feb. 22.

Both Lisa DeFrank-Cole, a professor of leadership studies at West Virginia University, and Jeffrey Waddoups, a professor of economics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, highlighted moments when Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren engaged in a fierce back-and-forth across the stage.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

While Trump tries to remake the federal courts, progressive state prosecutors are making huge inroads

Published

on

On the national level, President Donald Trump is appointing judges by the dozens to positions on US federal courts, ensuring a conservative tilt for a generation.

But on the local level, a small group of progressive state prosecutors have been elected, and they have big ideas about criminal justice reform.

Parisa Dehghani-Tafti -- who is now the top prosecutor in northern Virginia's Arlington county in the Washington suburbs -- knows she is not the "typical" candidate for the job.

"I am an immigrant. I grew up very poor. I have done some (public) defender work," says the 46-year-old, who was born in Iran, and is a mother to two black children.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump lobs late-night attacks at Bloomberg after debate flop: ‘Worst in the history of debates!’

Published

on

President Donald Trump took a victory lap around Mike Bloomberg after the billionaire candidate flopped in his first Democratic presidential debate.

The former New York City mayor qualified for the debate in Las Vegas just last week, and his rivals were waiting for him with pointed attacks -- especially Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), who eviscerated his record with women -- while Bloomberg appeared unprepared.

"Mini Mike Bloomberg’s debate performance tonight was perhaps the worst in the history of debates, and there have been some really bad ones," Trump tweeted Thursday at 1:19 a.m.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image