Quantcast
Connect with us

Marijuana activists stage Mexico City smoke-out to protest prohibition

Published

on

With the nation in the throws of a violent drug war, over 200 people gathered in a central Mexico City park Sunday to smoke marijuana and demand it be legalized, an AFP reporter witnessed.

The protestors withstood drizzling rain to hang out on the popular tourist drag of the Alameda to smoke the herb, which remains illegal in Mexico, although the country is among a handful of Latin American nations that allow for the possession of a small “personal dose” of the drug.

ADVERTISEMENT

Many participants smoked out of pipes decorated with skulls, which were said to allude to traditional pre-Hispanic cultures, as music was played and a petition was circulated to call for legalization.

RELATED: California’s Prop. 19 ‘could end Mexican drug war’

Support for legalizing such so-called “soft drugs” in Mexico has grown, especially among left wing parties as a means to curb drug gang-related violence that has left some 28,000 people dead in the last four years.

Hector Aguilar Camín, editor of the Mexican magazineNexos, and Jorge G. Castaneda, a former Mexican foreign minister and current lecturer at NYU, write in a Washington Post column that Mexican drug gangs could see their revenue drop 60 percent if marijuana was no longer a contraband item.

“As their immense profits shrank, the drug kingpins would be deprived of the almost unlimited money they now use to fund recruitment, arms purchases and bribes,” they write.

ADVERTISEMENT

Camin and Castaneda’s arguments join those of the former Republican governor of New Mexico, Gary E. Johnson, who wrote at the FireDogLake blog Friday that marijuana decriminalization is “probably the only practical way to weaken the drug cartels.”

“America’s policy for almost 70 years has been to keep marijuana—arguably no more harmful than alcohol and used by 15 million Americans every month—confined to the illicit market, meaning we’ve given criminals a virtual monopoly on something that US researcher Jon Gettman estimates is a $36 billion a year industry, greater than corn and wheat combined,” Johnson wrote.

Former president Vicente Fox (2000-2006), who led the conservative party of current President Felipe Calderon, has repeatedly voiced his own support for such a move.

ADVERTISEMENT

With AFP and additional reporting by Daniel Tencer.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s ‘sore loser’ tiny desk performance mocked by New Yorker writer: ‘This does not project strength’

Published

on

New Yorker writer Susan Glasser on Friday mocked President Donald Trump for whining about losing the 2020 presidential election while sitting behind a tiny desk.

Appearing on CNN, Glasser said she was amazed that someone as image-conscious as Trump wouldn't realize how weak he appeared on Thanksgiving while ranting about voter from behind a puny desk.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Tiny brain. Tiny man. Tiny desk. Massive ego.’ Donald Trump mocked for ‘throwing a tantrum’ at ‘the kids table’

Published

on

President Donald Trump gave a Thanksgiving Day address from a comically tiny desk in the White House, setting off a stream of mockery throughout the evening.

The president aired his grievances, lashed out at reporters and told outrageous lies about the election -- which he insisted had been stolen from him -- but most observers were distracted by that unusually small desk adorned with a large presidential seal.

hold me closer tiny-desk man

— Adam Weinstein (@AdamWeinstein) November 27, 2020

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

The biggest laugh of 2020 was the way the Trump administration travesty died with a whimper

Published

on

This story is part of a series on good things that happened in 2020. Read them all here.

I woke up just in time to see Donald Trump's tweet that started it all: "Lawyers News Conference Four Seasons, Philadelphia. 11:00 a.m."

It was four days after the election — a Sunday — and I'd crashed out the night before after endlessly refreshing the AP Politics Twitter feed and analyzing the cursed New York Times election needle for what felt like 90 hours straight. But for the first time in years, I woke up with a glimmer of political hope for our nation as it looked like Trump's window to victory was closing.

Continue Reading