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Tea Party groups admit Obama’s race is a factor

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Tea Party activists have fumed at accusations of intolerance and racism, insisting their concerns about President Barack Obama are policy-oriented. Yet dozens of Tea Party groups have openly admitted to the Washington Post that the president’s race is a factor in their activism.

In a lengthy investigation into the fledgling political movement that has made tremendous waves nationally, Amy Gardner reported that the Post identified more than 1,400 Tea Party groups across the nation and spoke extensively with 647 of them about their philosophies and ambitions.

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“Eleven percent said that Obama’s race, religion or ethnic background was either a ‘very important’ or ‘somewhat important’ factor in the support their group has received,” the Post concluded.

As per the Post’s reporting, that amounts to over 70 Tea Party organizations (eleven percent of 647) that willingly concede Obama’s race is fueling their members’ activism.

Gardner quoted organizers questioning the president’s citizenship and birth certificate, his Christian faith and “socialist” policies, with some going so far as to describe him as un-American.

“There are questions that don’t get answered, like citizenship and his birth certificate,” said Andy Stevens, 68, founder of the Tea Party Patriots in Anacortes, Washington. “I don’t know why questions keep popping up all the time. If something is irrefutable, the questions wouldn’t keep popping up.”

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Stevens was upset Obama doesn’t invoke “the creator” when discussing inalienable rights.

The Post’s investigation also found that the size and scope of the Tea Party movement has been “inflated” or misreported, concluding that some Tea Party organizations notably exaggerate the volume of groups or followers under their umbrella.

Self-identified Tea Party activists have overwhelmingly identified their main concerns as the growth of government, out-of-control spending and exploding deficits. They began organizing under the Tea Party banner just weeks after Obama’s inauguration.

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The movement that has upended entrenched elements within the Republican establishment and threatens to oust dozens of Democratic incumbents in November remains stubbornly against uniting behind a particular leader.

But when surveyed by the Post, their preferred public figure was former Alaska governor Sarah Palin (14 percent), followed by Fox News host Glenn Beck (7 percent) and South Carolina Republican Sen. Jim DeMint (6 percent).


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Three judges suspended for drunken 3 AM fight at White Castle — that ended with two shot

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Three judges were suspended after engaging in a drunken shooting outside a White Castle.

"Three Indiana judges involved in a Downtown Indianapolis fight in May that ended with two of the judges shot have been suspended without pay after the Indiana Supreme Court determined they committed judicial misconduct," the Indianapolis Star reports. "In an opinion issued Tuesday, the court said judges Bradley Jacobs, Andrew Adams and Sabrina Bell 'engaged in judicial misconduct by appearing in public in an intoxicated state and behaving in an injudicious manner and by becoming involved in a verbal altercation.'"

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What Zelensky knew: The devastating and darkly ironic impact of Trump’s attempt to bribe Ukraine

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In their effort to exculpate President Donald Trump in the impeachment inquiry, Republicans put Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky’s denial that he ever felt pressure from the White House to open up investigations into Democrats at the center of their argument. A new GOP memo says that both leaders have acknowledged “there was no pressure” on the famous July 25 call that sparked the inquiry and thus argues that the allegations made by Democrats that Trump abused his power don’t hold.

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Greta Thunberg says ‘people must finally wake up’ to the fact Trump is ‘so extreme’ on climate change

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Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg said Tuesday that US President Donald Trump's climate change denialism was "so extreme" that it had helped galvanize the movement to halt long term planetary warming.

She spoke in an interview with AFP on the eve of her departure from North America where she has spent almost three months.

"He's so extreme and he says so extreme things, so I think people wake up by that in a way," the 16-year-old said from on board a sailboat preparing to depart from the East Coast town of Hampton, Virginia for Europe early Wednesday.

"I thought when he got elected, now people will finally, now people must finally wake up," she continued.

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