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Florida airport to opt out of TSA screening

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Many Americans are frustrated and outraged at new Transportation Security Administration (TSA) screening policies that require full body scanning or invasive pat-downs at airports.

Now one airport in Central Florida has decided not to use TSA agents at all for screening their passengers.

Larry Dale, the CEO of the Sanford Airport Authority, told WDBO radio that his board has authorized him to use a private screening firm instead of TSA employees.

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“All of our due diligence shows it’s the way to go,” Dale said. “You’re going to get better service at a better price and more accountability and better customer service.”

The CEO expects to send the federal government final notification in January. The private screeners could be in place within the next 12 months.

Orlando International Airport is meeting Dec. 8 to consider using private contractors for their screenings.

Councilman Eric Erickson of Macon City, Georgia has also said that he wants Middle Georgia Regional Airport to stop using the TSA screeners.

Rep. John Mica (R-FL) has sent a letter to more than 150 of the nation’s largest airports urging them to use private contractors instead of the TSA.

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“I think TSA is overstepping its bounds,” Mica said.

The TSA notes that airports that opt out of the screening process are still required to follow TSA requirements including full body scans and pat-downs.


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2020 Election

Here’s how Trump intends to create ‘chaos and deadlock’ to steal the election from voters

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The author of a new piece outlining how President Donald Trump could steal the election from voters explained just how that might happen.

The Atlantic's Barton Gellman revealed the Trump campaign is exploring a strategy to pressure Republican-led state legislatures to appoint electors, instead of letting voters choose, and he told MSNBC's "Morning Joe" how that would work in practice.

"The only other time in history we had a debacle like this with possibility of the multiple competing slates of electors where two groups of people said, 'I'm the state elector for the state of Pennsylvania,' for example, it's supposed to go to Congress," Gellman said. "Congress is supposed to decide who are the legitimate electors, if any, from the state, and the problem is the electorate count act is one of the most garbled statutes ever passed by Congress, which is saying a lot."

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Botticelli painting expected to sell for record $80 million

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A painting by Italian Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli could fetch over $80 million when it goes under the hammer in New York in January, Sotheby's said Thursday -- a record auction price for the artist.

"Young Man Holding a Roundel" has been billed by the auction house as one of the greatest paintings from the era still in private hands.

It is expected to smash the $10.4 million auction record set seven years ago for a painting by the Florence native.The subject of the enigmatic portrait is not known, but art historians believe it could be a depiction of a close friend of the Medici family, which ruled the Italian city during Botticelli's life.

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Trump apologist thinks president made ‘huge mistake’ by admitting he won’t peacefully give up power

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A conservative who usually defends President Donald Trump admitted to CNN on Thursday that the president made a "huge mistake" when he refused to commit to having a peaceful transfer of power should he lose the 2020 election.

During a panel discussion on the president's latest controversial remarks about the upcoming election, liberal guest Bakari Sellers argued that Americans should be "very terrified" about Trump implicitly encouraging violence in the event that he loses.

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