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Joe Scarborough advises tea party lawmakers not to ‘scare little kids and pets’

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MSNBC host and former Republican Congressman Joe Scarborough counseled the incoming class of tea party legislators not to abuse their new-found powers, jesting that they might scare young children and animals.

Scarborough recalled to Parade magazine when the new Republican Congress of 1995 tried to trample a weakened President Bill Clinton and ended up paying the price for “overreaching” and appearing “shrill.”

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“If Republicans overreach in 2011, they will re-elect Barack Obama in 2012,” he said. “They need to focus but make sure they don’t scare little kids and pets. This is the Republican Party’s last chance—not just for me but for the American voters. They will either mean what they say or be swept aside.”

The 112th Congress will be sworn in Wednesday, and dozens of newly elected, tea party-backed Republicans are hoping to flex their muscle after campaigning vigorously against the Obama administration. Republicans will have a 241-194 majority in the House of Representatives, while Democrats maintain a slimmer 53-47 majority in the Senate.

Scarborough, who represented Florida’s 1st district from 1995 to 2001, continues to embrace his Republican affiliation, but has been more outspoken than colleagues in criticizing what he considers fringe elements in his party.

The rage of tea party supporters has been on full display during the last year and a half, as conservative activists fed up with Democratic governance have done everything from yell at lawmakers in town halls, shout at disease victims, and even reportedly spit on a congressman.

The host of MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” ruffled feathers among the conservative base weeks ago with a fierce op-ed in Politico criticizing Sarah Palin as unelectable and urging the Republican Party to “man up” and publicly air their doubts about her.

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“I just know she’s not qualified to be president,” Scarborough told Parade. “By the way, I don’t think she’s going to run. I don’t think it was a coincidence that a lot of that presidential talk came when she was releasing her book.”


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Joni Ernst accused of involvement in ‘dark money’ re-election scheme: report

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According to a report from the Associated Press, Sen. Joni Ernst (R-IA) has been accused of illegally working with an outside group to help her re-election prospects in a tough 2020 fight with Donald Trump on the ballot.

According to AP: "An outside group founded by top political aides to Sen. Joni Ernst has worked closely with the Iowa Republican to raise money and boost her reelection prospects, a degree of overlap that potentially violates the law."

"Iowa Values, a political nonprofit that is supposed to be run independently, was co-founded in 2017 by Ernst’s longtime consultant, Jon Kohan. It shares a fundraiser, Claire Holloway Avella, with the Ernst campaign," the report continued. "And a condo owned by a former aide — who was recently hired to lead the group — was used as Iowa Values’ address at a time when he worked for her."

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What makes Christmas movies so popular

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If you are one of those people who will settle in this evening with a hot cup of apple cider to watch a holiday movie, you are not alone. Holiday movies have become firmly embedded in Americans’ winter celebrations.

The New York Times reports a massive increase in new holiday movies this year. Disney, Netflix, Lifetime and Hallmark are now in direct competition for viewers’ attention, with both new releases and reruns of the classics.

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Mike Pompeo under increasing scrutiny as as Trump impeachment ramps up: report

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On Saturday, WVAS Radio's Scott Simon profiled Secretary of State Mike Pompeo — and how the impeachment investigation is shaping his political situation.

"As the impeachment inquiry against President Trump continues its march through Congress, questions are churning around his secretary of state, Mike Pompeo," wrote Simon. "For example, did he know, as witnesses testified before House investigators, that President Trump sought political favors from Ukraine in exchange for millions in U.S. assistance? Why did he take days to reveal he was on the now infamous July 25 call between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy? And does he believe allies of the president who — despite the findings of the intelligence community — claim that Ukraine, not Russia, interfered in the 2016 election?"

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