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Key Republican asks businesses which rules to change

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The incoming Republican chairman of the House oversight committee is seeking counsel from business groups about what federal regulations Congress should relax.

Rep. Darrell Issa of California has sent letters to 150 companies, trade organizations and research groups asking them what rules they believe are stifling innovation and job growth, the New York Times reported.

As the head of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, Issa will wield considerable influence over the nature and application of federal regulations over industry activity.

Politico reported that Issa reached out to, among others, the oil industry, drug manufacturers, health care providers and telecommunications companies.

“A lot of people have felt shut out of the process the last few years, and they have welcomed the opportunity to give input,” Issa spokesman Kurt Bardella told the Times.

The move was derided by Democrats, who characterized Issa and Republicans as pawns of special interests.

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It “[l]eav[es] no doubt who is in charge of the Republican agenda,” the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee said in a statement. “This is even more evidence that House Republicans are in the business of protecting corporate special interests instead of creating middle income jobs.”

Incoming House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) defended Issa, telling reporters Tuesday that the letter was part of a larger Republican agenda to help businesses grow and “stop the job-killing regulations.”

The move clarifies key divisions in governing philosophies between Republicans and Democrats —  the former believe fewer regulations boost business and economic growth while the latter value the necessity of rules to protect consumers and in some cases the environment.

Events of recent years, such as the financial meltdown of 2008 and last year’s Gulf oil spill, have raised important questions about the necessity of regulations to ensure accountability and good practices in the business community.

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QAnon authors in a fight over doing an audiobook — because they think their followers can’t read

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On Monday, The Daily Beast reported that the authors of a popular book for believers in the QAnon conspiracy theory are in a bitter fight over whether or not to release an audiobook version.

QAnon: An Invitation to The Great Awakening came out last year and peaked near the top of the Amazon bestseller list in March. One of the book's co-authors, Dustin Nemos, is publicly attacking another co-author, who goes by the name of "JoeM," for his "petty and hostile and paranoid" refusal to help produce an audiobook, and notes that it is necessary because a disproportionate number of QAnon believers are elderly, have bad eyesight, and may not be able to read the book as text. JoeM, for his part, has accused Nemos of being a "grifter" who is trying to make a buck off of true believers.

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Population of Earth to reach 9.7 billion in 2050: UN

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The world population is expected to climb to 9.7 billion in 2050 from 7.7 billion today, with the population of sub-Saharan Africa doubling, a United Nations report released Monday said.

The population could then grow to 11 billion by 2100, according to the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs's "World Population Prospects" report.

The study paints a picture of a future in which a handful of countries see their populaces surge as life expectancy lengthens while the global growth rate slows amid declining fertility rates.

By 2050, more than half of the world's population growth will be concentrated in just nine countries: India, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Tanzania, Indonesia, Egypt and the United States.

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Trump’s only winning strategy is to tear down Democrats — because he has nothing to promote: MSNBC panel

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President Donald Trump has little to promote for 2020, so political analysts on MSNBC think that he'll likely spend the campaign working to tear everyone else down.

Howard Fineman noted that if Trump intends to do a "tear down" campaign, the most important things Democrats will have are policy proposals to set themselves apart from a White House that is unwilling to pass anything through Congress.

"It's just a question of can he do what he did in 2016 and 2018, which was, frankly, mobilize voters in a fear-tactic kind of way," said Fineman during Monday's "Meet the Press."

Host Kasie Hunt said that it seems the new Trump poll numbers show that his base is losing enthusiasm as they go into the election.

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