Quantcast
Connect with us

US airlines cancel flights as winter storm bears down

Published

on

CHICAGO/ATLANTA – US airlines canceled thousands of flights on Tuesday ahead of a blizzard that has promised near-record snowfall in the U.S. Plains and the central Midwest.

The storm was expected to stretch across 2,000 miles — dumping up to 2 feet of snow in the central and upper Midwest, as well as ice and sleet in the southern Midwest.

The largest US airlines — United Continental, Delta Air Lines, AMR Corp’s American Airlines and Southwest Airlines — had scrapped more than 4,000 flights by midday.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We are currently at approximately 1,500 total cancellations system wide,” American Airlines spokesman Tim Smith said. “That’s about 45 percent of our operations and it could go higher through the day.”

United Continental, formed from a merger of United and Continental airlines, had canceled 1,450 flights; Delta had canceled 625 flights and Southwest said it eliminated 700 flights through Wednesday afternoon.

“We recommend all customers check united.com before they go to the airport to check the status of their flight,” United spokeswoman Megan McCarthy said.

In Dallas, icy conditions that are part of the same weather system closed Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, a hub for American Airlines, briefly on Tuesday morning. The city’s Love Field Airport, which is primarily served by Southwest, was also closed while crews cleared snow and ice and was expected to reopen later in the day, assistant director Kenneth Gwyn said.

ADVERTISEMENT

David Magana, public affairs manager at DFW Airport, said one runway was reopened at the airport on Tuesday, and ice was being cleared from six others.

Magana said Dallas-Fort Worth Airport had 300 departures canceled so far for the day; the airport normally has about 850 daily departures.

“We’ve been plowing runways and treating them,” Magana said. “Roadways around the airport are still fairly icy as well.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Unpredictable winter weather is a yearly nuisance for airlines and can result in a hit to quarterly earnings. But early flight cancellations can help airlines avoid stranding their passengers at airports and on grounded planes.

In recent years, both JetBlue Airways and American Airlines suffered public relations nightmares when harsh weather forced last-minute cancellations and left passengers stuck at airports.

Last year, the U.S. Transportation Department approved an airline fine of up to $27,500 per passenger for tarmac delays that exceed three hours. Passengers could be let off a plane, if they made that request.

ADVERTISEMENT

“They’re canceling ahead of time,” said Terry Trippler, owner of travel website Airlinerulestoknow.com. “They can lose the revenue without going further in the hole.

“They’re getting smart. They’ve figured it out,” he said.

Airline shares were broadly higher with the Arca airline index up 1.2 percent. AMR shares were up a penny at $7.06 on the New York Stock Exchange and Delta rose 7 cents to $11.74.

ADVERTISEMENT

United Continental shares were down 9 cents at $25.31, and Southwest was off 4 cents at $11.81.

(Additional reporting by Christine Stebbins in Chicago, editing by Maureen Bavdek)

Source: Reuters US Online Report Top News

Mochila insert follows…

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Former FBI agent explains why Trump just opened himself to more legal problems

Published

on

Former FBI agent Asha Rangappa explained that the recent revelations that President Donald Trump made a promise to a foreign leader that made an intelligence official uncomfortable enough to declare themselves a whistleblower.

Rangapp explained that the President has a fairly wide latitude to conduct foreign affairs as he sees fit. But "when it comes to the 'outside world,' the President represents the sovereign: He is basically the voice of the United States and can negotiate with world leaders on its behalf."

Continue Reading

Facebook

Canada’s Trudeau admits to racist ‘brownface’ makeup in high school Halloween costume

Published

on

Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau apologized Wednesday for wearing brownface makeup to a party 18 years ago, as he scrambled to get on top of a fresh blow to a re-election campaign dogged by controversy.

Time magazine published the photograph one week into a federal election campaign with Trudeau's Liberal Party in a tight contest against the Conservatives led by Andrew Scheer.

Trudeau, 47, whose party won a landslide victory in 2015, has already been under attack for an ethics lapse and other controversies.

The black-and-white photograph shows Trudeau, then 29, wearing a turban and robes with his face, neck and hands darkened at a gala party in 2001.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

New York cop who became El Chapo’s security guard arrested for selling cocaine and taking bribes

Published

on

A New York cop is being prosecuted after he was outed for selling cocaine and taking bribes after he went to work for drug kingpin El Chapo.

The New York Daily News reported Wednesday that Officer Ishmael Bailey had his bail set at $50,000 after he was arrested and arraigned in Queens Criminal Court. He was charged with possession and sale of narcotics, conspiracy, bribe receiving as a public servant and failing to perform duties as a public servant.

Lawyer Jeff Cohen argued that Bailey had two children and had to pay child support. The lawyer explained that Bailey “does understand the severity of his charges.”

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image