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Egypt’s youth ready for the future, protester says in moving interview

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A young female protester at Cairo’s Tahrir Square told filmmakers that the widespread rallies against President Mubarak show the Egyptian people “can take this country forward.”

The interview was part of the upcoming documentary “Zero Silence” by filmmakers Jonny von Wallström and Alexandra Sandels. The documentary is about the youth movement in the Middle East and their opposition to authoritarian regimes.

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“We don’t want the regime,” the unnamed young woman said. “We want either a constitutional amendment or something that says that the next president of Egypt will be chosen by the people. We want to chose our president because we want to take this country into the future.”

“We are going to keep demonstrating peacefully,” she continued. “Even if we get attacked by the police forces, we are peaceful and we are going to continue protesting peacefully until our demands are met.”

“The Egyptian youth are protecting their own homes, they are coming together and they are uniting. Everybody is coming together to protect their areas. We don’t need the thugs of the police force to protect our own homes.”

Documents from the US State Department, released by secrets outlet WikiLeaks, showed that Egyptian police regularly abused and tortured suspects.

Police were also caught trying to loot priceless artifacts from the museum in Cairo and commit other acts of violence “in an attempt to stoke fear of instability,” a rights group claimed Tuesday.

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Looking determinedly into the camera, the young woman insisted that Egypt’s blanket shut down of Internet and mobile phones “had an opposite effect” than what was intended.

“Even though they shut down the Internet, this is not just a Facebook revolution or Internet revolution,” she said.

“As you have seen, there are hundreds of thousands of people in the streets even though the phone lines were shut off on Friday. People still came out and demonstrated because this is not about the Internet. This is about the needs and demands of the Egyptian people.”

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This video is from the upcoming film “Zero Silence,” filmed Jan. 31, 2011 in Cairo’s Tahrir Square.

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‘I’m entitled’: Kayleigh McEnany defends her 11 mail-in votes while calling it ‘fraud’ for the masses

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White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday faced questions from Fox News about why she had voted by mail 11 times even though President Donald Trump has called absentee ballots a "scam."

McEnany was asked about her voting history after the Tampa Bay Times reported that she had used mail-in voting nearly a dozen times in recent years.

"So why is it OK for you to do it?" Fox News host Ed Henry asked McEnany. "I understand you are traveling, you're in a different city. But how can you really be assured that your votes were counted accurately but when other people do it, it's fraud."

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American Airlines to cut 30% of management staff

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American Airlines will cut 30 percent of its management and support staff in its latest belt-tightening move during the prolonged COVID-19 downturn, the company disclosed Thursday.

The big US carrier outlined a series of measures to reduce headcount throughout its operations in an email to staff that was released in a securities filing Thursday.

American currently has a team of 17,000 people in management and support, meaning the actions planned will cut about 5,100 jobs.

The move follows statements from United Airlines, Delta Air Lines and other carriers that have signaled deep job cuts due to sinking air travel demand from coronavirus shutdowns.

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‘They want their civil war’: Far-right ‘boogaloo’ militants have embedded themselves in the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis

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Young, white men dressed in Hawaiian-style print shirts and body armor, and carrying high-powered rifles have been a notable feature at state capitols, lending an edgy and even sometimes insurrectionary tone to gatherings of conservatives angered by restrictions on businesses and church gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

Just as many states are reopening their economies — and taking the wind out of the conservative protests — the boogaloo movement found a new galvanizing cause: the protests in Minneapolis against the police killing of George Floyd.

A new iteration of the militia movement, boogaloo was born out of internet forums for gun enthusiasts that repurposed the 1984 movie Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo as a code for a second civil war, and then modified it into phrases like “big luau” to create an insular community for those in on the joke, with Hawaiian-style shirts functioning as an in-real-life identifier. Boogaloo gained currency as an internet meme over the summer of 2019, when it was adopted by white supremacists in the accelerationist tendency. In January, the movement made the leap from the internet to the streets when a group boogaloo-ers showed up at the Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va.

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