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Murdoch’s iPad newspaper to be launched

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WASHINGTON – News Corp.’s Rupert Murdoch is to unveil “The Daily” on Wednesday, a digital newspaper for the iPad, the tablet computer the media tycoon has said may be the savior of the struggling news industry.

Murdoch, the 79-year-old chairman and chief executive of News Corp., and Eddy Cue, vice president of Internet Services at iPad maker Apple, are to take the wraps off The Daily at an event at the Guggenheim Museum in New York.

The Daily had originally been scheduled to be unveiled in San Francisco last month but the event was delayed at the last minute by Apple’s announcement that chief executive Steve Jobs was going on medical leave.

According to The Wall Street Journal, which is owned by News Corp., The Daily will cost 99 cents a week and will be sold exclusively through Apple’s online iTunes store.

New issues will be automatically delivered to a subscriber’s iPad every morning.

The Journal said News Corp. has hired about 100 people to work on The Daily, including veteran journalists from the New Yorker, Forbes, the New York Post and other publications.

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News Corp. has budgeted 30 million dollars for the first year of the launch, according to Forbes.

AllThingsD.com, a News Corp.-owned technology blog, said The Daily will feature news articles, interactive graphics, videos and photos tailored to take advantage of the iPad’s touchscreen capabilities.

There will be a free site for The Daily on the Web at thedaily.com but it will feature only a small selection of material from the newspaper, it said.

AllThingsD said The Daily will be offered free for the first two weeks.

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The Daily brings together three of Murdoch’s passions — newspapers, the iPad, and finding a way to charge readers for content online in an era of shrinking newspaper circulation and eroding print advertising revenue.

In an interview in April with The Kalb Report, Murdoch called the iPad a “glimpse of the future.”

“There’s going to be tens of millions of these things sold all over the world,” the News Corp. chief executive said. “It may be the saving of newspapers because you don’t have the costs of paper, ink, printing, trucks.

“It doesn’t destroy the traditional newspaper, it just comes in a different form,” Murdoch said.

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A digital newspaper for subscribers is Murdoch’s latest move in his drive to get consumers to start paying for news on the Web after years of getting it for free.

The Wall Street Journal requires a subscription for full access to WSJ.com and Britain’s The Times and The Sunday Times, two other News Corp. newspapers, recently erected pay walls around their websites.

Murdoch is not the only publisher looking to the iPad to increase revenue.

A number of US publications have crafted paid applications for the hot-selling Apple device including Esquire, Glamour, GQ, the New Yorker, People, Vanity Fair and Wired.

In November, British tycoon Richard Branson launched a monthly style and culture magazine for the iPad called “Project.”

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How Teach for America evolved into an arm of the charter school movement

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When the Walton Family Foundation announced in 2013 that it was donating $20 million to Teach For America to recruit and train nearly 4,000 teachers for low-income schools, its press release did not reveal the unusual terms for the grant.

Documents obtained by ProPublica show that the foundation, a staunch supporter of school choice and Teach For America’s largest private funder, was paying $4,000 for every teacher placed in a traditional public school — and $6,000 for every one placed in a charter school. The two-year grant was directed at nine cities where charter schools were sprouting up, including New Orleans; Memphis, Tennessee; and Los Angeles.

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Quantum physics experiment shows Heisenberg was right about uncertainty — in a certain sense

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The word uncertainty is used a lot in quantum mechanics. One school of thought is that this means there’s something out there in the world that we are uncertain about. But most physicists believe nature itself is uncertain.

Intrinsic uncertainty was central to the way German physicist Werner Heisenberg, one of the originators of modern quantum mechanics, presented the theory.

He put forward the Uncertainty Principle that showed we can never know all the properties of a particle at the same time.

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Why do conservatives hate Oberlin College so much?

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When I was an undergraduate at Oberlin in the mid-Aughts, there was a student in my class year who was obsessed with 19th-century British Royal Naval culture. Every Friday evening, he would host a sing-along in a dorm lounge, for which he would bring xeroxes of historical sea shanty lyrics and pass them around so that we could sing along, waving our glasses of “grog.” This was a semi-established event — he had distributed flyers around campus advertising the weekly British Royal Naval sea-shanty singalong and grog-drinking event, which would extend late into the night. Though he was not a resident of the dorm where it took place, he was welcomed into the lounge by its members, and became a fixture of sorts.Like many well-endowed liberal arts schools in rural areas, Oberlin College functions as a sort of de facto social welfare state, and is designed to encourage and cultivate one’s passions, even if they are not strictly academic. Thus, after writing up a proposal for the student-run activities board, the same student, the British Royal Navy culture guy, was able to plan, organize and execute a ticketed Royal Naval Ball, held in the atrium of the science center. The event featured 20 dishes of authentic British era-appropriate cuisine, cooked by student chefs, several courses of wine and port, and a violinist present to play period-specific music. The whole affair culminated with a traditional, British partner line dance — its sole inauthenticity the fact that we didn’t pay attention to our dance partners’ genders the way the Brits would have.
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