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Mexico’s Senate passes climate change bill

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Mexico’s Senate has unanimously passed a climate change bill aimed at reducing carbon emissions by 50 percent by 2050, following Britain in creating legally binding emissions goals.

The law — approved late Thursday and which still needs to be signed by President Felipe Calderon — seeks to promote policies and incentives to reduce carbon emissions, decrease the use of fossil fuels and make renewable power more competitive.

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It will set up a National Institute of Ecology and Climate Change to coordinate efforts from various ministries as well as a fund for efforts at tackling climate change.

It also seeks to encourage citizens to help conserve Mexico’s environment.

The senators underlined how the country of 112 million was already experiencing the effects of climate change, including a record drought in many areas this year and heavier and more frequent rains in other regions.

The law was welcomed by environmental groups, amid concerns about Mexico’s ability to enforce legislation.

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“It’s something that out of necessity we have to apply… We hope that Mexico will keep being a leader on climate change,” Juan Beazaury, Mexico representative for The Nature Conservancy environmental organization, told AFP.

Calderon has made the global fight against climate change a key theme of his six-year presidency, due to end this December.

Mexico was 13th in the world for producing greenhouse gas emissions between 2009 and 2012, according to the bill.

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In 2009, the United States attempted, unsuccessfully, to pass a similar climate change bill.

[Photo of a Mexican farmer in his drought claimed ranch via AFP Photo/Jesus Alcazar]


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‘Looks like the smoking gun’: Meghan McCain less skeptical of impeachment after Bill Taylor testimony

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Meghan McCain gave her strongest indication yet that President Donald Trump was doomed to impeachment, but she was in no mood to talk about it on her birthday.

The conservative host of "The View" turned 35 on Wednesday, a day after former Ukraine ambassador told lawmakers that President Donald Trump had directed efforts to freeze military aid to pressure the foreign ally to investigate political rival Joe Biden.

"This is just killing my vibe," McCain said. "I'm sorry, it's very bad."

"Look, I can't -- I just can't today," McCain said. "I'm so sorry. I would love to stay on this, but it's really bad. It looks like it's highly unethical, and it looks like the smoking gun. That's my political analysis for today. It's my 35th birthday, and I want to move on."

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Watch: All of Trump’s failed defenses for his Ukraine scandal

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CNN's Kate Bolduan on Wednesday reminded her viewers that Trump allies' defenses of the president throughout the Ukraine scandal have continued to evolve after new facts emerge that undercut their older defenses.

While talking with the New Yorker's Susan Glasser, Bolduan delivered an exhausted list of all the failed defenses that the president and his supporters have made to justify Trump's efforts to push Ukraine to investigate his political opponents.

"First it was the president was trying to root out corruption when it came to Ukraine," she began. "Then it was there was no direct ask coming from the president. Then it was the whistleblower can't be trusted, then it was Schiff helped the whistleblower write the complaint so it can't be trusted, and then it was the president was joking, Republicans said, when he said on camera that he would like to see investigations. Then it was there was no quid pro quo because Ukraine didn't know the aid was being withheld... and now it's the process is unfair, so you can't impeach."

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Republicans commit ‘significant breach’ after storming closed-door hearings by bringing cellphones to secure area

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As various news outlets have reported, over a dozen House Republicans this Wednesday tried to force their way into the closed door hearings where deputy assistant secretary of defense Laura Cooper is set to testify in the impeachment inquiry into President Trump's Ukraine fiasco. According to Republicans, the closed-door hearings are a sign that Democrats are shutting them out of the impeachment process, creating a lack of transparency -- even though there are three Republicans who are present at the hearings and are able to ask questions.

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