Quantcast
Connect with us

Sen. Tom Udall: VAWA ‘crucial’ for Native American women

Published

on

Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) on Wednesday called on Congress to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, claiming new provisions in the bill were “crucial” to protect Native American women from domestic abuse.

The provision would allow tribal courts to prosecute non-Native American individuals for domestic violence crimes committed on tribal land.

The VAWA, originally passed in 1994 and reauthorized twice since, provides funding to local communities to improve their response to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and stalking. The federal grants from the law support police training, victim services, transitional housing, and legal assistance.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Since its passage in 1994, domestic violence has decreased by over 50 percent,” he said on the Senate floor. “And the victims of these crimes have been more willing to come forward. Knowing they are not alone. Knowing they will get the support they need. Knowing that crimes against women will not be tolerated.”

“Unfortunately, not all women have received the full benefits of the Violence Against Women Act,” Udall added.

Native American women are more than twice as likely than other women in the United States to be raped, and three out of five Native American women will experience domestic violence, he explained.

To make matters worse, many of those crimes “go unprosecuted and unpunished” because tribes cannot prosecute non-Native Americans for domestic violence crimes committed on tribal land. Only federal prosecutors have the authority to prosecute non-Native Americans for domestic violence crimes against their Native American spouses or partners. More than half of Native women are married to non-Native husbands.

“Native women should not be abandoned to a jurisdictional loophole,” Udall said. “In effect, these women are living in a prosecution-free zone.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Republicans oppose the current reauthorization of the VAWA because it would allow battered undocumented immigrants to claim temporary visas and expand protections to gays and lesbians. Republicans have drafted an alternative bill that eliminates the provisions related to Native Americans, undocumented immigrants and LGBT individuals.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

The real DC showdown: Pelosi vs. Trump

Published

on

Love her or hate her, Nancy Pelosi is a classy, effective and persuasive Speaker.

Repeatedly through the Trump presidency, she has stepped up to offer just the right gesture, just the right opinion, just the right level of evenness or passion that proves effective in making the role of leadership believable.

Along the way, she manages to count votes, keep her caucus in line and stand up for a totally understandable and admirable bar of justice and American value, for the Constitution itself.

Her statements yesterday in outlining in measured tones the reasoning that Donald Trump’s actions have left “no choice” but moving forward towards impeachment were well-said, logical, and belied the emotion behind them.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s tax cuts and tariffs have been even more disastrous than skeptics predicted: Paul Krugman

Published

on

In a column celebrating the first anniversary of Donald Trump declaring himself "Tariff Man," New York Times columnist and Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman attempted to explain the president's love of tariffs and noted that the negative economic impact in the past year has surpassed even the worst expectations.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump’s undermining of efforts to fight Putin detailed in ex-CIA agent’s disturbing new column

Published

on

A recently retired CIA agent reveals that President Donald Trump was a "wild card" that prevented a full-scale effort to combat Russian aggression against the U.S. and its allies.

Marc Polymeropoulos, who retired from the agency in June, said in column posted at Just Security that the CIA issued an informal "call to arms" in the wake of Kremlin interference in the 2016 election, but those efforts were hampered by Trump's relationship with Russia's president Vladimir Putin.

"The Call to Arms required a whole-of-agency effort to counter the Kremlin," Polymeropoulos wrote. "It involved moving resources and personnel inside CIA. Most importantly, it required a change in mindset, similar to what occurred within the Intelligence Community after 9/11, that an 'all-hands-on-deck' approach was required."

Continue Reading