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Justice Dept. drops case against ex-politician John Edwards

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WASHINGTON — The US Justice Department Wednesday said it would drop remaining charges against former Democratic star and presidential hopeful John Edwards who was charged with misusing campaign funds.

The lawyer turned politician saw his stellar career collapse after he fathered a child with videographer Rielle Hunter in 2007 and then lied about their affair to his cancer-stricken wife, Elizabeth, and the public.

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On May 31, Edwards was found not guilty of one count of using campaign donations to hide his pregnant mistress as he sought the Democratic presidential nomination in 2008. A mistrial was declared on the five remaining counts.

The Justice Department however issued an order Wednesday for dismissal on those remaining charges.

“The jurors could not reach a unanimous verdict on five of the six counts of the indictment, however, and we respect their judgment. In the interest of justice, we have decided not to retry Mr. Edwards on those counts,” said Assistant Attorney General Lanny Breuer.

“We knew that this case — like all campaign finance cases — would be challenging,” Brewer added. “But it is our duty to bring hard cases when we believe that the facts and the law support charging a candidate for high office with a crime.”

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Edwards had faced a potential 30-year jail term and 1.5 million dollar fine.

“Big sigh of relief. Ready to move forward with life,” his daughter Cate Edwards, 30 and an attorney, said in a message on Twitter.

The trial, in Greensboro, North Carolina, looked at how campaign funds donated to Edwards by wealthy supporters were used — almost one million dollars that came from two benefactors. Edwards, 58, was accused of using the funds to benefit Hunter, who worked on a campaign video for him and with whom he fathered a daughter, to cover up their affair.

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The funds came from a wealthy Texas lawyer, Fred Baron, who died in 2008, and Rachel “Bunny” Mellon, now 101, widow of banker Paul Mellon.

[Image via IowaPolitics.com]


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Federal judge overturns ObamaCare’s transgender protections, because Jesus

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A U.S. District Court judge in Texas has overturned the protections written into ObamaCare for transgender people, ruling they violate the religious rights of healthcare providers who hold religious beliefs that oppose the existence of transgender people.

On Tuesday Judge Reed O'Connor, appointed by President George W. Bush, "vacated an Obama-era regulation that prohibited providers and insurers who receive federal money from denying treatment or coverage to anyone based on sex, gender identity or termination of pregnancy," The Hill reports.

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Sanctuaries protecting gun rights and the unborn challenge the legitimacy and role of federal law

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In June 2019, the small Texas town of Waskom declared itself a “Sanctuary City for the Unborn.”

Waskom’s city council passed an ordinance that labels groups – like Planned Parenthood, NARAL and others – that perform abortions or assist women in obtaining them “criminal organizations.”

The ordinance borrows from a similar resolution passed in March by Roswell, New Mexico. Unlike the merely rhetorical Roswell resolution, however, the Texas law bans most abortions within city limits. There are no abortion providers in the town, so it is not clear how the town would enforce the ordinance. It might, perhaps, deter an organization from opening a clinic.

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Quantum dots that light up TVs could be used for brain research

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While many people love colorful photos of landscapes, flowers or rainbows, some biomedical researchers treasure vivid images on a much smaller scale – as tiny as one-thousandth the width of a human hair.

To study the micro world and help advance medical knowledge and treatments, these scientists use fluorescent nano-sized particles.

Quantum dots are one type of nanoparticle, more commonly known for their use in TV screens. They’re super tiny crystals that can transport electrons. When UV light hits these semiconducting particles, they can emit light of various colors.

That fluorescence allows scientists to use them to study hidden or otherwise cryptic parts of cells, organs and other structures.

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