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Iraqi governor links bombing suspects to vice president

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An Iraqi provincial governor on Monday said that 18 suspects arrested in connection with bomb attacks are linked to Vice President Tareq al-Hashemi, who has been sentenced to death in absentia.

On Sunday several bombings rocked Nasiriyah, capital of the southern province Dhi Qar, including one near the French honorary consulate that killed one person.

“We have arrested 18 people who prepared the bomb attacks in Nasiriyah. They belong to Hashemi’s Tajdid movement,” Dhi Qar governor Taleb al-Hassan told a joint news conference with French ambassador Denys Gauer.

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A security official told AFP that “the terrorist acts in Baghdad and across Iraq were prepared by groups affiliated with Hashemi.”

“These individuals learned from (Hashemi’s) lawyers and bodyguards that his sentence would be delivered on Sunday. With these attacks they were trying to divert attention,” he added on condition on anonymity.

A wave of attacks across Iraq on Saturday and Sunday killed 88, according to security sources.

Hassan’s accusations come a day after the fugitive Iraqi vice president, who has been convicted of running a death squad and is currently on the run in Turkey, was sentenced to hang for the murder of a lawyer and a brigadier general.

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Hashemi rejected the sentence at a news conference in Turkey.

“While reconfirming my absolute innocence and that of my guards, I totally reject and will never recognise the unfair, the unjust, the politically motivated verdict, which was expected from the outset of this funny trial,” Hashemi said.

The leading Sunni Muslim official branded the sentence “the final phase of the theatrical campaign” carried out by his political rival, Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and “his politicised judiciary”.

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‘I’ve seen smarter cabinets at IKEA’: The most memorable signs from the global climate strike

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"Why should we go to class if you won't listen to the educated?" one homemade sign asked.

With millions marching to demand bold climate action in more than 150 countries around the world on Friday, a number of sentiments expressed on homemade signs and through other demonstrations captured the world's attention.

An estimated 400,000 people attended strikes across Australia to start off the day of action. The Australian Conservation Foundation shared a video of some of the young people, including one marcher who proclaimed, "You'll die of old age, we'll die of climate change," addressing the world leaders who climate scientists say are not working nearly fast enough to end fossil fuel extraction and the resulting carbon emissions which are causing global warming, rising sea levels, droughts, and other extreme weather events.

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Trump felt free to ask for Ukraine election interference after Mueller let him off the hook: CNN guest

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On CNN's "New Day Weekend," author and commentator Garrett Graff noted that President Donald Trump's attempt to push Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden came right after former special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russian interference in 2016 ended — and suggested the two were related.

"You know, Garrett, there may be some people thinking 'Gosh, we just got out of the whole scenario with the Mueller report. Now we have this again,'" said anchor Christi Paul. "Do you get a sense that there are people looking at this saying 'I think I have confidence in the 2020 election?'"

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Alexander von Humboldt was the first person to understand climate change — more than 200 years ago

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Alexander von Humboldt was born on September 14, 1769. In his day, he was a globetrotting, convention-defying hero— one of the first recorded individuals to raise environmental concerns. To make him hip for a new generation, all it takes is a rediscovery of Humboldt by the young climate strikers across the globe. Their numbers are growing, their task is huge, and they are now urging adults to join them. Why let parents fiddle when the house burns? On May 22, grown-ups at the Columbia Journalism Review, The Nation, and The Guardian listened and launched Covering Climate Now, a project to encourage more coverage of climate change in the media. Bill Moyers, the keynote speaker, pointed out that from 2017 to 2018, major network coverage of climate issues fell 45 percent to a total of a mere 142 minutes. And on May 23, with her knack of being spot-on, 16-year-old climate activist and rising star Greta Thunberg promptly wrote of taking on the climate change challenge: “It’s humanity’s job.”

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