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Big Bird says Mitt Romney made him famous

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Though he’s been a mainstay on Sesame Street for decades, Big Bird said getting name-dropped by Mitt Romney this past week made him feel like he’s famous.

“I was walking down the street and I felt like everybody recognized me,” he said during a rare nighttime sojourn, an appearance on Saturday Night Live. “It’s so weird to think that just a few days ago, I could just blend in like any other normal eight-foot-tall talking bird.”

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Big Bird and his show’s network, PBS, became a hot topic after the Oct. 3 debate between Romney and President Barack Obama, when Romney said he would end the subsidy to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting as a means to trim the national deficit.

“I like PBS. I love Big Bird. I actually like you, too,” Romney told moderator Jim Lehrer. “But I’m not gonna keep on spending money on things to borrow from China to pay for.”

Romney’s specific targeting of PBS attracted criticism, given that the $444 million subsidy accounted for .037 percent of the $1.2 trillion deficit. However, Sherrie Rollins Westin, executive producer of Sesame Workshop, the non-profit group behind the show, recently told CNN’s Soledad O’Brien the bulk of the show’s funding comes through sales of licensed products, sponsorships and donations.

“Quite frankly, you can debate whether or not there should be funding of public broadcasting,” Westin said. “But when they always try to tout out Big Bird and say, ‘We’re going to kill Big Bird,’ that actually is misleading. Because Sesame Street will be here. Big Bird lives on.”

Big Bird didn’t directly address Romney’s threat to fire him, but he did tell “Weekend Update” host Seth Meyers he got a lot of tweets on the subject — just not the social media kind.

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“No, I’m a bird,” he said. “Tweeting is how we talk.”

Watch Big Bird’s appearance on SNL, posted Sunday on Hulu, below.

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Matt Gaetz forgot which network he was on: Surprised CNN anchor said ‘I’ve never been called Sean Hannity’

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Rep. Matt Gaetz seemed to confuse cable news networks during a Thursday appearance

Gaetz was interviewed by CNN's Chris Cuomo, who aggressively challenged Gaetz on the facts as the Florida Republican attempted to defend President Donald Trump.

Despite the fact Cuomo's interview was nothing like the puff segments Gaetz is used to on Fox, the congressman seemed confused by the end.

"Congressman, you are always welcome, wherever I am, at nine or eleven, whenever," Cuomo said.

"Thanks Sean," Gaetz replied.

"Did you just call me Sean?" Cuomo asked. "Did you just call me Sean?"

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Internet debates ‘the dumbest thing Brian Kilmeade has ever said’

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Fox News personality Brian Kilmeade has received a great deal of attention -- and criticism -- during the Trump era.

Kilmeade co-hosts one of the President's favorite shows, "Fox and Friends," with Steve Doocy and Ainsley Earhardt on weekday mornings. He also a show on the Fox News Radio network and frequently appears on "The Five."

The former Ultimate Fighting Championship play-by-play sportscaster has also been harshly criticized for the type of comments that make the show a favorite for the president.

Journalist Molly Jong-Fast, who was widely praised her interview of Lisa Page, decided to explore Kilmeade's comments.

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Giuliani’s potential witness tampering in Ukraine is impossible to separate from Trump: Judiciary Democrat

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On Thursday's edition of MSNBC's "The Beat," Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) broke down how Rudy Giuliani's misconduct in Ukraine is "inseparable" from President Donald Trump's.

"To everyone who asks whether we are moving too quickly, I say the president's lawyer is moving quickly to continue to ask a foreign government to cheat our elections, and doing nothing is completely off the table," said Swalwell, who sits on the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, the two most crucial committees in the impeachment inquiry. "We have to secure our elections. We have powerful, uncontradicted evidence now. And now is the time to hold the president accountable and determine just which impeachment articles we should proceed with."

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