Quantcast
Connect with us

Libyan assembly dismisses prime minister

Published

on

TRIPOLI — Libyan premier Mustafa Abu Shagur was dismissed on Sunday after the General National Congress rejected his proposed “crisis” cabinet of just 10 ministers, days after his first line-up was also turned down.

The embattled Abu Shagur, who had been given 72 hours to come up with a new cabinet, was relieved of his duties and the GNC will have to elect a new prime minister within the next three to four weeks.

Before he had even put forward his second cabinet list in just four days, a motion of no confidence in Abu Shagur was signed by 126 assembly members.

That was rejected by the GNC president.

But when his pared-down list was put to the vote, 125 members of the 186 members present in the 200-seat GNC did not express “confidence” in his choices, against 44 members for and 17 abstentions, according to a live state television broadcast.

Under GNC rules, the assembly will now elect a new premier.

ADVERTISEMENT

“In face of the dangers threatening the country, I present to you a crisis government restricted to 10 ministers, rejecting all geographical considerations,” Abu Shagur earlier told the GNC.

He proposed a defector colonel who led the rebellion in the east against late dictator Moamer Kadhafi last year as defence minister and a police general for the interior ministry.

He was taking neither geographical nor political considerations into account, Abu Shagur said, criticising the assembly for rejecting his original choices.

“The first government was not perfect. And we should have discussed and modified it,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I will not assume responsibility for a team that is not of my own liking,” he said, and called on the GNC to “assume its responsibilities at this historic time.”

Abu Shagur also accused assembly members and political blocs of blackmail.

“The political parties have decided to withdraw their confidence in me,” he said, alluding to rumours of a deal between the rival liberal National Forces Alliance coalition and the Muslim Brotherhood’s Justice and Construction Party.

The NFA of wartime premier Mahmud Jibril was left off Abu Shagur’s first cabinet list after failed negotiations, and the two blocs were reported to have agreed to form a unity government.

ADVERTISEMENT

More than 100 protesters stormed the national assembly’s headquarters on Thursday, demanding greater representation for the western town of Zawiyah and reportedly calling for Abu Shagur’s resignation as he presented his first line-up.

Residents of the east and south complain they were marginalised for 42 years under Kadhafi before the 2011 conflict that toppled his regime and killed him.

The first list of 29 ministers, including one woman, included several members of the transitional government and many unknown figures, while there were no representatives of the main liberal coalition.

GNC representatives on Thursday lambasted Abu Shagur’s ministerial choices, calling them either incompetent, unknown, or remnants from the previous transitional government.

ADVERTISEMENT

Abu Shagur, a technocrat, won his post on September 12 by a small margin in a run-off vote against Jibril.

He was committed to forming a government of consensus and says he negotiated with all parties. But he also had to tackle fallout from a deadly attack on the US consulate in Benghazi on September 11 and anti-militia protests.

The attack led to the killing of four Americans, including ambassador Chris Stevens.

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

How Teach for America evolved into an arm of the charter school movement

Published

on

When the Walton Family Foundation announced in 2013 that it was donating $20 million to Teach For America to recruit and train nearly 4,000 teachers for low-income schools, its press release did not reveal the unusual terms for the grant.

Documents obtained by ProPublica show that the foundation, a staunch supporter of school choice and Teach For America’s largest private funder, was paying $4,000 for every teacher placed in a traditional public school — and $6,000 for every one placed in a charter school. The two-year grant was directed at nine cities where charter schools were sprouting up, including New Orleans; Memphis, Tennessee; and Los Angeles.

Continue Reading

Latest Headlines

Quantum physics experiment shows Heisenberg was right about uncertainty — in a certain sense

Published

on

The word uncertainty is used a lot in quantum mechanics. One school of thought is that this means there’s something out there in the world that we are uncertain about. But most physicists believe nature itself is uncertain.

Intrinsic uncertainty was central to the way German physicist Werner Heisenberg, one of the originators of modern quantum mechanics, presented the theory.

He put forward the Uncertainty Principle that showed we can never know all the properties of a particle at the same time.

Continue Reading
 

Commentary

Why do conservatives hate Oberlin College so much?

Published

on

When I was an undergraduate at Oberlin in the mid-Aughts, there was a student in my class year who was obsessed with 19th-century British Royal Naval culture. Every Friday evening, he would host a sing-along in a dorm lounge, for which he would bring xeroxes of historical sea shanty lyrics and pass them around so that we could sing along, waving our glasses of “grog.” This was a semi-established event — he had distributed flyers around campus advertising the weekly British Royal Naval sea-shanty singalong and grog-drinking event, which would extend late into the night. Though he was not a resident of the dorm where it took place, he was welcomed into the lounge by its members, and became a fixture of sorts.Like many well-endowed liberal arts schools in rural areas, Oberlin College functions as a sort of de facto social welfare state, and is designed to encourage and cultivate one’s passions, even if they are not strictly academic. Thus, after writing up a proposal for the student-run activities board, the same student, the British Royal Navy culture guy, was able to plan, organize and execute a ticketed Royal Naval Ball, held in the atrium of the science center. The event featured 20 dishes of authentic British era-appropriate cuisine, cooked by student chefs, several courses of wine and port, and a violinist present to play period-specific music. The whole affair culminated with a traditional, British partner line dance — its sole inauthenticity the fact that we didn’t pay attention to our dance partners’ genders the way the Brits would have.
Continue Reading
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

I need your help.

Investigating Trump's henchmen is a full time job, and I'm trying to bring in new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have more stories coming you'll love. Join me and help restore the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link

Investigating Trump is a full-time job, and I want to add new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have stories coming you'll love. Join me and go ad-free, while restoring the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link