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Marijuana legalization wins support from some Colorado Republicans

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On Tuesday, the Republican Liberty Caucus of Colorado, former GOP congressman Tom Tancredo and Republican state Sen. Shawn Mitchell all came out in favor of Amendment 64, as supporters of the ballot initiative attempted to make their case to conservatives.

“The core value of the Republican Party is personal responsibility rather than collective prior restraint,” the Republican Liberty Caucus of Colorado said in a statement.” Personal responsibility means holding all individuals responsible for the actions they take rather than the words they use, the thoughts they think or the products they consume. Personal Responsibility means that a person who enjoys alcohol or marijuana without harming others is no criminal.”

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Joining members of the Republican Liberty Caucus at a press event in Denver, Tancredo described marijuana prohibition as a symptom of the “nanny-state.” Last month, the former congressman compared marijuana prohibition to alcohol prohibition.

Mitchell also announced his support of marijuana legalization on Tuesday, saying it was “clear the War on Drugs isn’t working.”

If approved by voters, the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act (Amendment 64) would allow for the limited possession and cultivation of cannabis by adults age 21 and over. It would also allow the state and local governments to enact regulations on the commercial production and distribution of marijuana, as well giving local governments the option to prohibit marijuana sales altogether.

Yes on 64 uploaded a video to YouTube on Tuesday that presented the “conservative case” for marijuana legalization. The video featured an old interview with economist Milton Friedman, where he criticized then-President Ronald Reagan for declaring a “war on drugs.” The video also shows quotes from conservatives like Pat Robertson and William F. Buckley Jr.

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Seventeen states and the District of Columbia have enacted laws to legalize medical marijuana. But Colorado would be the first state to legalize the drug for recreational use. A ballot initiative to legalize marijuana in California — Proposition 19 — was defeated in 2010.


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2020 Election

GOP’s cancellation of presidential primaries could blow up in Trump’s face — here’s why

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In recent weeks, Republican state party committees have been moving to cancel presidential primaries to prevent Never-Trump conservatives, like former Reps. Joe Walsh (R-IL) and Mark Sanford (R-SC) and former Gov. Bill Weld (R-MA), from challenging the president from the right. So far, Republicans in Arizona, Kansas, Nevada, and South Carolina have all announced they will scrap the voting process for 2020.

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Alternet 2020

Nancy Pelosi faces serious challenges — but she’s failed miserably in two key ways

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As I wrote earlier this week, with its muddled messaging on impeachment, the House Democratic leadership may have figured out a way of both demoralizing the Democratic base and firing up Trump's supporters. It's a mess.

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Trump’s anti-worker labor nominee is more like the ‘Secretary of Corporate Interests’

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Progressive groups and Democratic lawmakers expressed serious concerns Thursday about corporate attorney Eugene Scalia — President Donald Trump's pick to lead the Labor Department — as the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee met to consider his nomination.

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