Quantcast
Connect with us

Beloved Yellowstone wolf shot dead by hunters

Published

on

A wolf beloved by visitors and tracked by scientists at Yellowstone national park has been shot dead by hunters, reigniting debate over the targeting of the animal.

The alpha female, known as 832F and described by wildlife enthusiasts as a “rock star” due to her popularity, was found dead on Thursday outside the park’s boundary in Wyoming, the New York Times reported Sunday.

ADVERTISEMENT

Over the last few weeks, eight wolves that had been fitted with $4,000 GPS collars to help researchers track their movement have been killed. It has led to complaint by animal rights groups and calls for fresh limits to be put in place ahead of the inaugural wolf trapping season, due to come in on 15 December.

Naturalists at Yellowstone are said to be dismayed that so many of the wolves they are tracking have been shot dead by hunters. The animals are tagged in an effort to study their habits and population spread.

According to the New York Times, researchers at the park found 832F’s death especially distressing. The female wolf was one of Yellowstone’s most popular inhabitants with tourists.

“She is the most famous wolf in the world,” wildlife photographer Jimmy Jones told the newspaper. His picture of the animal appears in the current issue of American Scientist.

Gray wolves were taken off the endangered species list last year, after seeing population figures rebound since the mid-1990s, following their reintroduction to the Rockies.

ADVERTISEMENT

At the end of 2011, there were at least 98 wolves in 10 packs – plus two loners – in Yellowstone, according to the park’s annual wolf project report. The park stretches across Montana, Idaho and Wyoming.

Hunting, which is legally sanctioned in the northern Rockies, has been defended as a legitimate way to reduce predators to livestock. But anti-hunt campaigners say population numbers are not large enough to support the practice and that the animals bring in tourists to the region.

The eight collared wolves killed were all shot outside of the park’s perimeter. Data from 832F’s collar suggests the wolf rarely ventured beyond the park and then only for brief periods.

ADVERTISEMENT

Alongside hunting, concern is also turning to the effect of wolf trapping in the coming season. Shane Colton, commissioner of the Montana fish, wildlife and parks department, said closing some areas to trapping or setting strict quotas will be on the table during a meeting Monday.

“We don’t want to close any area off if we don’t have to. But if we keep losing collared wolves … management becomes difficult,” Colton said.

ADVERTISEMENT

[Image: Wolf In Yellowstone National Park” on Shutterstock]


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Security guard interrupts COVID-denier’s speech and quits on the spot: ‘She’s trivializing the Holocaust’

Published

on

A video from Germany is circulating on social media, showing a COVID-denier addressing a rally, only to have her speech interrupted by a security guard who was disgusted by her comparisons of pandemic restrictions to the Holocaust.

“I feel like Sophie Scholl, since I've been active in the resistance, giving speeches, going to protests, distributing flyers," the woman says to the audience, referring to the famous "White Rose" resistance fighter who opposed the Nazis during World War II.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

The View’s Ana Navarro bashes Republicans refusing to stop Trump: ‘They’re going to go down in shame’

Published

on

"The View" co-hosts are furious that President Donald Trump is still refusing to stand down after losing the 2020 election. To make matters worse, Republican communications consultant Ana Navarro blames Republicans for allowing the madness to persist for so long that it's now starting to put the United States in a compromised situation.

"Look, I don't know what it's going to take because really it should have happened weeks ago," said Navarro. "States are beginning to certify their results. Electors vote in a couple of weeks, but you know, Whoopi, I keep talking about history and how history is going to judge this. There are going to be books written about this. It's going to be studied by school kids in 30 years and 40 years."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump quits treaty allowing US to fly reconnaissance missions over Russia – will destroy planes

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Sunday formally exited the Open Skies Treaty, but now he's moving to scrap the planes, ensuring President Joe Biden will not be able to re-enter the program easily.

The Open Skies Treaty is an 18-year old agreement designed to allow the U.S. to fly reconnaissance  missions over Russia to ensure the Pentagon and the President are informed of military deployments and movements. First proposed in 1992, the treaty was formalized in 2002. 34 nations are party to the agreement, and all are allowed to fly unarmed aircraft over any member nation. The goal is to ensure transparency and mutual understanding.

Continue Reading