Quantcast
Connect with us

Co-author of conservative anti-immigration report resigns

Published

on

The co-author of a conservative think tank’s report accusing Latino immigrants of having a “substantially lower” average IQ than white Americans resigned on Friday.

According to The Washington Post, the Heritage Foundation confirmed that Jason Richwine left the organization in the wake of bipartisan criticism of the report, which said that giving the country’s 11 million undocumented immigrants “amnesty” in the form of a route to become U.S. citizens would cost the country $6.3 trillion in social services and lost workplace productivity.

ADVERTISEMENT

Politico reported that, while Heritage acknowledged his departure, the foundation was standing by the report’s cost estimate for immigration reform. The foundation is also reportedly bringing in an outside public-relations group to further address the flap created by Richwine’s report.

“Jason Richwine let us know he’s decided to resign from his position,” the group said in a statement. “He’s no longer employed by Heritage. It is our long-standing policy not to discuss internal personnel matters.”

Opposition to the report grew louder once Richwine’s 2009 doctoral dissertation at Harvard came under closer examination.

“The average IQ of immigrants in the United States is substantially lower than that of the white native population, and the difference is likely to persist over several generations,” Richwine wrote, an argument he would revisit for the Heritage report. “The consequences are a lack of socioeconomic assimilation among low-IQ immigrant groups, more underclass behavior, less social trust, and an increase in the proportion of unskilled workers in the American labor market.”

Richwine also proposed using “High-IQ” immigrants to address those issues in the U.S., but rebranding the process as a “skills-based” policy so as to avoid complaints.

ADVERTISEMENT

Not only did other conservatives knock the Heritage report for, among other things, failing to consider immigrants’ ability to become citizens who do not rely on social services, but Congressional Hispanic Caucus head Rep. Rubén Hinojosa (D-TX) called it a mark against the conservative community.

“The Heritage Foundation has always been a stalwart of conservatism, but this is common-place, ugly racism and xenophobia dressed up in economic hyperbole,” Hinojosa said. “I urge everyone in the conservative community to step up and speak out against this disgraceful, so-called report.”

[Image via Shutterstock]

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Privacy rights may become next victim of killer pandemic

Published

on

Digital surveillance and smartphone technology may prove helpful in containing the coronavirus pandemic -- but some activists fear this could mean lasting harm to privacy and digital rights.

From China to Singapore to Israel, governments have ordered electronic monitoring of their citizens' movements in an effort to limit contagion. In Europe and the United States, technology firms have begun sharing "anonymized" smartphone data to better track the outbreak.

These moves have prompted soul-searching by privacy activists who acknowledge the need for technology to save lives while fretting over the potential for abuse.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards honors staffer who died from COVID-19

Published

on

Gov. John Bel Edwards (D-LA) offered a moving tribute to a member of his staff who died from COVID-19.

"On behalf of the first lady and my entire administration, it is with heavy hearts that we mourn the loss of our dear April, who succumbed to complications from COVID-19," he posted on Twitter, along with photos.

"She brightened everyone’s day with her smile and was an inspiration to everyone who met her," he continued.

"She lived her life to the fullest and improved the lives of countless Louisianans with disabilities as a dedicated staff member in the Governor's Office of Disability Affairs. April worked hard as an advocate for herself & other members of the disability community," he wrote.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Washington state nurses share shocking stories from their war against coronavirus

Published

on

by Ken Armstrong and Vianna Davila

Nurses at one hospital in southeastern Washington state have alleged that, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, they were ordered by supervisors to use one protective mask per shift, potentially exposing themselves to the novel coronavirus.

At another hospital, just east of Seattle, nurses had to use face shields indefinitely.

At a third hospital, on Washington’s border with Oregon, nurses reported that respirators were expired. The hospital responded, the nurses said, by ordering staff to remove stickers showing that the respirators might be as much as three years out of date.

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image