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General Motors joins call for U.S. to address climate change

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General Motors, the largest US automaker, on Wednesday joined a call for the United States to take greater action on climate change as it said that environmental concerns were critical for business.

General Motors became the first automaker among 40 US companies in a joint appeal for policymakers in Washington to lead a “coordinated effort” against climate change, after the failure of earlier legislative proposals.

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“We want to be a change agent in the auto industry,” Mike Robinson, GM vice president of sustainability and global regulatory affairs, said in a statement.

GM is the maker of the Chevrolet Volt, the first electric plug-in car on the US market, and has set company-wide goals that includes reducing energy intensity by 20 percent over the decade to 2020.

The stance marks a turnaround. Detroit’s Big Three long protested fuel economy standards and produced gas-guzzling trucks and sports utility vehicles as their Japanese competitors made inroads with eco-friendly cars.

The so-called Climate Declaration, launched in April, also includes major companies such as online retailer eBay, tech giant Intel, coffee leader Starbucks and numerous makers of sportswear.

The declaration warns that climate change is a real threat and urges action so that the United States can “remain a true superpower in a competitive world,” although it does not endorse specific proposals.

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President Barack Obama has vowed new efforts by the world’s largest economy to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases blamed for the planet’s rising temperatures and increasingly frequent disasters.

Efforts for nationwide restrictions on emissions have failed in Congress, with lawmakers of the rival Republican Party questioning the science behind climate change and saying that action would be too costly.


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Ivanka Trump’s tweet raises eyebrows: ‘Why is a senior White House official endorsing a food product?’

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As her big brother was dragging their 14-year-old half brother into the 2020 campaign, senior White House advisor Ivanka Trump was endorsing a line of canned food products.

If it’s Goya, it has to be good. Si es Goya, tiene que ser bueno. pic.twitter.com/9tjVrfmo9z

— Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) July 15, 2020

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Florida outbreak is ‘much worse’ than Gov. DeSantis is letting on: Former COVID-19 data chief

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Rebekah Jones, the Florida data scientist who in May claimed that she was fired for refusing to manipulate state coronavirus data to meet the Republican governor's reopening criteria, has issued a new warning: The ongoing outbreak is "much, much worse" than it has been painted by the administration.In a Monday interview with MSNBC host Lawrence O'Donnell, Jones, who built the state government's coronavirus data portal, identified a number of failures since she left her state job. Florida recently posted the highest daily caseload in a single day across all 50 U.S. states.
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2020 Election

Jeff Sessions’ fate is a warning for us all

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Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions lost his primary race to be the Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Alabama on Tuesday night in a landslide, according to Decision Desk HQ. Early returns showed him losing the shot to win back his old seat by more than 20 points to opponent Tommy Tuberville, who will face off against Democratic Sen. Doug Jones in November.

It wasn't a surprising loss for Sessions, though it is a brutal one. He gave up his seat in the Senate to become President Donald Trump's attorney general, and he lost his big chance to return because his one-time benefactor turned against him. Trump enthusiastically endorsed Tuberville while viciously and repeatedly denouncing Sessions.

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