Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Sopranos’ fans mourn Gandolfini at funeral

Published

on

Family, friends and fans united in grief Thursday in an emotional sendoff for James Gandolfini, star of the hit TV series “The Sopranos.”

Gandolfini, a three-time Emmy winner for his portrayal of emotionally vulnerable New Jersey mobster Tony Soprano, died June 19 after a heart attack in a hotel in Rome, where he was traveling with his 13-year-old son. He was 51.

ADVERTISEMENT

Mourners converged on the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine, an Episcopal church that is among the world’s biggest, well before the mid-morning start of Gandolfini’s funeral.

Some 1,500 people filled the pews, including Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey, the state across the Hudson River from New York City where Gandolfini was born and “The Sopranos” was set.

Present as well for the two-hour funeral were cast members of the HBO series, whose creator David Chase delivered a eulogy in the form of a letter to his fellow American of Italian heritage.

“We both loved family, work, people, food, alcohol, talking,” said Chase, who remembers his friend as “a sad boy, loving and confused… That’s why I think you were such a great actor, because of that boy inside.”

Others in attendance included actor Alec Baldwin, like Gandolfini a veteran of Broadway theater, and Edie Falco, who played Tony Soprano’s wife Carmela in the series that ran from 1999 to 2007.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The end of The Sopranos has a different meaning to me now,” said Baldwin on his Twitter feed after the funeral. “Rest in peace, Jimmy.”

Gandolfini’s second wife Deborah Lin Gandolfini spoke of a loving husband and attentive father to their nine-month-old daughter Liliana who was “always trying to help someone.”

Emotions were no less strong outside the cathedral.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We’ve been up since 4:30 this morning,” said Stephanie Solana, a fan who traveled to the Upper West Side from The Bronx with her two granddaughters to pay her respects.

“My heart is broken. It is really bad for the fans, but he will always live on for me. We’ll never forget him.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“I am probably the oldest fan here,” echoed a 93-year-old New Yorker, who preferred not to give her name. “He was one of the greatest actors of his generation.”

“The Sopranos,” she added, was nothing less than “a work of art … better than Shakespeare. It had a real depth.”

On Wednesday, family and close friends gathered away from prying cameras for an invitation-only private viewing at a funeral home in Park Ridge, New Jersey, near where the actor grew up.

ADVERTISEMENT

Gandolfini had a long film and stage career before lending his heavy stature and big grin to play a depressed mafioso in “The Sopranos,” the celebrated series that ran from 1999 to 2007 in the United States.

The son of an Italian bricklayer was in Italy for the Taormina Film Fest in Sicily where he was to have received an award and participate in a roundtable discussion last weekend.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

So long, Steve King: 9-term white supremacist GOP congressman from Iowa loses primary

Published

on

U.S. Congressman Steve King, a nine-term Republican of Iowa, has just lost his primary to a GOP challenger. It's a huge fall from grace: In 2014 The Des Moines Register labeled the former earth-moving company founder a "presidential kingmaker."

But his racist, white nationalist, white supremacist, anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic, homophobic, transphobic, biphobic remarks and disturbing ties to far right radical European politicians – including one he endorsed who has ties to a neo-Nazi, finally caught up with him.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

When the president’s son-in-law truly was a great success

Published

on

For many Americans, the idea of the president tasking his son-in-law with solving national, even international, crises, seems problematic, if not absurd. But it happened once before and turned out to be the kind of “great success story” our current first family wants us to believe in again. Slightly over a century ago, as the US mobilized for the First World War, the nation faced devastating breakdowns of its financial and transport systems. In response, President Woodrow Wilson leaned heavily on his talented and experienced Treasury Secretary, William McAdoo, who just happened to be his son-in-law. Looking back at this episode tells us a lot about what makes for successful emergency management at the highest levels of government.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Here are 7 ways Donald Trump is just like Henry Ford — and why that’s not good for American democracy

Published

on

On May 21, speaking at the Ford Motor Company’s Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, Donald Trump paid his latest homage to Henry Ford, lauding the family’s “good bloodlines” with Ford’s great grandson sitting in the front row.

Ford, like Trump, was obsessed with bloodlines—with the idea that race and genetic origins determined who counted as the “best people.”

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image