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Martin Luther King remembered in D.C. exhibit

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Civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr is being remembered in a Washington, D.C. exhibition held to tie-in with the 50th anniversary of his famous march on the US capital.

“One Life: Martin Luther King, Jr”, takes a look back at the epic sweep of the slain Nobel laureate’s life and times.

Using photographs, paintings, prints and assorted memorabilia, the exhibit charts King’s rise from his early triumphs in co-ordinating the bus boycotts in Montgomery, Alabama to his emergence at the head of the national civil rights movement.

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The exhibition also devotes sections to his famous “I have a dream” speech as well as the August 28, 1963 “March on Washington”, when an estimated 250,000 descended on the US capital.

Curator Ann Shumard said she hoped the exhibition, which runs until June 1, 2014, would demonstrate that King retained a hard practical side behind his soaring oratory.

“Yes he had vision, but he had a practical plan of what he would … trying, to make that reality,” Shumard said.

“I hope that the image of this exhibition conveys…of his very dynamic life. He was not merely a dreamer but a doer.”

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Mitch McConnell’s impeachment rules pass by 53-47 vote — here’s what happens next in Trump’s senate trial

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The US Senate voted along party lines on Tuesday to set the rules for President Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial.

By a 53 to 47 vote, the Republican-controlled Senate approved an "organizing resolution" for the trial proposed by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Before approving the rules, the Senate voted down several amendments proposed by Democrats seeking to subpoena witnesses and documents from the White House and State Department.

These are the next phases in Trump's impeachment trial, just the third of a president in US history:

- Opening arguments -

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Chief Justice Roberts admonishes lawyers at Senate impeachment trial

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Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court John Roberts made his first major intervention in President Donald Trump's impeachment trial shortly before 1 a.m. Wednesday morning.

After House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-CA) finished his closing arguments on why former National Security Advisor John Bolton should testify, the White House team went on the attack. Yelling and demanding apologies, the president's team was more animated than they'd been all night. Roberts then admonished the House and White House on their language.

Claiming the Senate is the "world's greatest deliberative body" -- despite what he had witnessed during 12 hours of the impeachment trial -- Roberts complained about language that was "not conducive to civil discourse."

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White House lawyers begin yelling at Democrats during late-night impeachment trial — after Trump starts tweeting

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President Donald Trump woke up and began tweeting around midnight EST during the Senate impeachment trial over the amendments over the rules. That's when a noticeable thing changed on the Senate floor: Trump's team started yelling.

Nearing 1 a.m. EST Tuesday morning while the president was tweeting about impeachment, his team began attacking Rep. Jerry Nadler (D-NY) personally. They called him a liar and accused him of attacking the president and demanded an apology. After nearly 12 hours this was the first time the White House got even remotely animated after a dull defense of the president.

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