Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) on Tuesday defended Republicans use of the filibuster, saying the tactic was necessary to prevent the nomination of extremists like MSNBC host Rachel Maddow.


Republicans have filibustered dozens of President Barack Obama's executive nominations, delaying the confirmation of heads of multiple government agencies. Paul said he also plans to hold up the confirmation of James Comey for FBI director over the use of drones.

"I think the leverage of using the filibuster to get information and to make the President obey the law, I think it is a very important tool and our Founding Fathers put it in there for precisely this reason," Paul said on Fox News.

"For that reason, to call attention to what they're trying to do, especially if you're in the minority you an do that and, frankly, if you didn't have a filibuster, what would stop President Obama from appointing say Al Sharpton as attorney general or Rachel Maddow on the Supreme Court," host Eric Bolling added.

"Right," Paul responded. "If you were to get an extremist like that, someone with an extreme point of view, the majority here could pass it with 51 votes, but with the filibuster then it would take 60 votes, so you're less likely to get someone with those kinds of extreme views to be nominated and approved by the Senate."

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