Quantcast
Connect with us

SeaWorld denies film’s claims that keeping killer whales in captivity caused deaths of three people

Published

on

Marine park owner says film investigation into death of orca trainer in Orlando is ‘inaccurate’ and ‘exploits tragedy’

The US marine park SeaWorld has denied claims made in a new film that its policy of keeping killer whales in captivity led to the deaths of three people.

Critically acclaimed documentary Blackfish first screened at the Sundance film festival in January and is due to open in US cinemas this weekend. It centres on the orca Tilikum, which it claims has been involved in three fatalities since being captured in 1983 off the coast of Iceland. These include the death of animal trainer Dawn Brancheau at SeaWorld Orlando in 2010 after she slipped or fell into a tank and was mauled. “There is no documented case of a killer whale ever killing anybody in the wild. It’s only in captivity where these incidents have happened,” director Gabriela Cowperthwaite told ABC News’ Nightline TV news programme.

ADVERTISEMENT

Representatives for SeaWorld, which has marine parks in Orlando, Florida, San Diego, California and San Antonio, Texas, issued a statement labelling the film “inaccurate and misleading”. The statement read: “Blackfish is billed as a documentary, but instead of a fair and balanced treatment of a complex subject, the film is inaccurate and misleading and, regrettably, exploits a tragedy that remains a source of deep pain for Dawn Brancheau’s family, friends and colleagues.”

It continued: “To promote its bias that killer whales should not be maintained in a zoological setting, the film paints a distorted picture that withholds from viewers key facts about SeaWorld – among them, that SeaWorld is one of the world’s most respected zoological institutions, that SeaWorld rescues, rehabilitates and returns to the wild hundreds of wild animals every year, and that SeaWorld commits millions of dollars annually to conservation and scientific research. Perhaps most important, the film fails to mention SeaWorld’s commitment to the safety of its team members and guests and to the care and welfare of its animals, as demonstrated by the company’s continual refinement and improvement to its killer whale facilities, equipment and procedures both before and after the death of Dawn Brancheau.”

Blackfish is due for a limited release in UK cinemas next week: 26 July. It does not yet have an Australian release date but screened at the Sydney film festival last month.

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media 2013

[“Killer Whale” on Shutterstock]

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Facebook

Trump says he is Israel’s best friend — and that some Jewish-Americans ‘don’t love Israel enough’

Published

on

US President Donald Trump aimed to make inroads Saturday in the politically important Jewish-American vote with a Florida speech where he declared himself the best friend Israel has ever had.

At a conference in Hollywood, Florida, the Republican real estate magnate said Jewish-Americans had been wrong to vote for Democrats under his predecessor Barack Obama.

"So many of you voted for people in the last administration," he said.

"Someday you'll have to explain that to me because I don't think they liked Israel too much."

By contrast, Trump said, "the Jewish state has never had a better friend in the White House than your president, Donald J. Trump."

Continue Reading

Facebook

Pearl Harbor veteran interred on sunken USS Arizona

Published

on

Will Smith still feels "emotional" about homelessness years after playing a destitute man in one of his most acclaimed film roles, the Hollywood star has told charity campaigners braving a fierce New York winter night to sleep rough.

Hundreds of people had gathered in Times Square on Saturday, rugged up and ready to bunk down in freezing temperatures, in a campaign to raise funds for what organizers said was record homelessness globally.

Smith told the crowd that his Oscar-nominated role in "The Pursuit of Happyness" -- a 2007 biopic of a salesman forced to live on the streets of San Francisco with his young son -- was a "life-changing experience" that had allowed him to understand the misery of poverty.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

‘Emotional’ Will Smith campaigns against homelessness in New York

Published

on

Will Smith still feels "emotional" about homelessness years after playing a destitute man in one of his most acclaimed film roles, the Hollywood star has told charity campaigners braving a fierce New York winter night to sleep rough.

Hundreds of people had gathered in Times Square on Saturday, rugged up and ready to bunk down in freezing temperatures, in a campaign to raise funds for what organizers said was record homelessness globally.

Smith told the crowd that his Oscar-nominated role in "The Pursuit of Happyness" -- a 2007 biopic of a salesman forced to live on the streets of San Francisco with his young son -- was a "life-changing experience" that had allowed him to understand the misery of poverty.

Continue Reading