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Study: Public polls underestimate same-sex attraction, especially among Christians

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Recent research suggests that people are more honest about the extent of their attraction to their own sex if they are assured that their answers will be anonymous. According to Bloomberg News, unless people believe that their identities will be kept secret and separate from their answers, they tend to be less than honest about their same sex attractions and, interestingly, about their negative attitudes toward LGBT people.

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A team of researchers at Ohio State University found that when respondents were assured of anonymity, their admission to same sex attraction and activity rose sharply. In a normal survey, an average of 17 percent of those surveyed (12 percent of men, 24 percent of women) said they have had a sexual experience with someone of their own sex. For the anonymous, or “veiled” survey, the number rose to 27 percent (17 percent of men and 43 percent of women), an increase of 58 percent.

In the standard survey, 11 percent or respondents said they did not consider themselves to be heterosexual. In the veiled result, the percentage leapt to 19 percent, a 65 percent increase.

However, the incidence of anti-LGBT sentiment underwent a similar jump between standard and veiled survey results. Bloomberg’s Cass R. Sunstein wrote, “Did participants believe that discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation should be illegal? In the standard survey, only about 14 percent said no. That number increased to 25 percent in the veiled report.”

Sixteen percent of respondents said they would be uncomfortable having a LGBT manager at work, whereas the veiled result was 27 percent.

The amount of variance between standard and veiled answers among participants varied sharply by age group. Younger respondents’ replies about same sex attractions varied hardly at all. Researchers attribute the increased honesty to the decrease in societal stigma toward LGBT people.

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Among older people and those who identify as Christian, the variance between their standard and veiled answers was particularly extreme. The veiled report showed an increase in non-heterosexuality and same sex experiences of more than 100 percent.

Also, the difference between those who were nominally accepting of an LGBT manager at work, but who privately expressed negative feelings at that prospect was most acute among respondents who identify as Republicans. “A minority of Republicans (35 percent) said they would be unhappy with an LGBT manager,” wrote Sunstein. “Under the veiled report, most Republicans (67 percent) said they would be unhappy.”

The Ohio State team’s results suggest that the real LGBT community is significantly larger than has been reported under normal survey models. It is also important to note, Sunstein said, “that Coffman and her colleagues didn’t have a representative sample, so the total percentages can’t be taken as reflective of what the general American population thinks and does. Among other things, the participants in their study were younger, more liberal and better educated than the general U.S. population.”

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[image of happy lesbian couple via Shutterstock.com]


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China vows to retaliate for Trump’s Rose Garden press conference — and could impose new sanctions on America

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US President Donald Trump said Tuesday he was ending preferential trade treatment for Hong Kong and had signed into law an act that authorises sanctions on banks over China's clampdown in the international finance hub.

In a discursive news conference dominated by attacks on his domestic rivals, Trump declared himself to be the toughest president ever on China, a country he is increasingly positioning as his nemesis ahead of November elections.

Trump announced that he had issued an executive order on Hong Kong as he predicted decline for the restless city, on which Beijing recently imposed a tough new security law.

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2020 Election

Trump’s former White House doctor Ronny Jackson wins GOP runoff for Congress in Texas

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Ronny Jackson, the former White House physician and President Donald Trump's onetime nominee for secretary of veterans affairs, has won his bid for the Republican nomination for a solidly red congressional seat in the Texas Panhandle.

With 100% of polling locations reporting, though some mail-in ballots will still need to be counted, Jackson held a lead of 11 percentage points over Josh Winegarner, a veteran agriculture expert and lobbyist. Jackson and Winegarner were competing for a seat being vacated by U.S. Rep. Mac Thornberry, R-Clarendon, who is retiring and held the seat since 1995.

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Ivanka Trump’s tweet raises eyebrows: ‘Why is a senior White House official endorsing a food product?’

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As her big brother was dragging their 14-year-old half brother into the 2020 campaign, senior White House advisor Ivanka Trump was endorsing a line of canned food products.

If it’s Goya, it has to be good. Si es Goya, tiene que ser bueno. pic.twitter.com/9tjVrfmo9z

— Ivanka Trump (@IvankaTrump) July 15, 2020

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