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Senate Leader Harry Reid: I am against fast tracking the Trans Pacific Partnership

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The White House on Thursday put a brave face on a rebuke by the top Senate Democrat on trade policy, which will complicate its attempts to negotiate huge commerce pacts with Asia and Europe.

President Barack Obama’s plans to conclude the deals, a centerpiece of his economic and foreign policy, absorbed a blow when Senator Harry Reid came out against granting the White House trade promotion authority.

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Without “fast track” powers, which mean deals agreed by the president will not be amended in Congress, Washington will find it harder to conclude pacts with key trading partners.

Reid’s move, part of delicate mid-term election year politics which are squeezing the pro-trade block in Congress, is a blow to Obama’s hopes of reaching a Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) with 12 nations and a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) with Europe.

“Leader Reid has always been clear on his position on this issue,” White House spokesman Jay Carney told reporters on Air Force One.

“The president’s commitment was made clear again in his State of the Union address.”

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Carney said the twin trade pacts were a “very important opportunity to expand trade, to not cede this territory to our competitors.

“The president will continue to press to get it done.”

Reid, who as the leader of Senate Democrats controls which legislation is brought up for a vote, said Wednesday that now was not the time to think about bringing a request for trade promotion authority to Congress.

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“I’m against ‘fast track,'” he said.

“I think everyone would be well advised just to not push this right now.”

Trade Promotion Authority would allow Congress to pass or reject trade deals on simple up or down votes, barring lawmakers from changing results of delicate, years-long negotiations between Washington and other nations.

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Obama seeks to forge stronger trade ties with Pacific Rim nations as a key component of his strategy of rebalancing US resources to Asia.

His administration has placed a high priority on the TPP at a time when China — which is not included — is building its regional influence.

A free-trade deal with Europe would be the world’s biggest. The EU estimates it would bring annual benefits of 119 billion euros ($164 billion) for the bloc’s 28 member states, and only slightly less for the United States.

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Many labor groups, which back Democrats, oppose such deals because they would increase competition and potentially lower labor standards.


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In extreme crises, conservatism can turn to fascism. Here’s how that might play out

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5 movie "Back to the Future," Marty McFly (played by Michael J. Fox) travels in a time machine from the 1980s to the 1950s. When he tells people of the '50s he is from the '80s, he is met with skepticism.

1950s person: Then tell me, future boy, who's President of the United States in 1985?

This article first appeared at Salon.com.Marty McFly: Ronald Reagan.

1950s person: Ronald Reagan? The actor? [chuckles in disbelief] Then who's vice president? Jerry Lewis [comedian]?

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Who are the young people behind the Catalonia protest violence?

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The violent protests that have swept Catalonia over the jailing of nine separatist leaders have involved veteran anarchists and youthful troublemakers as well as outraged separatists, some of whom became radicalised only recently.

"I am 24, have a masters and a job and I never imagined myself setting fire to a barricade with my face masked," said one protester who gave her name only as Aida.

She has joined in protests every day since they erupted in the region after Spain's Supreme Court on Monday sentenced nine Catalan separatist leaders to up to 13 years in jail for sedition over a failed 2017 independence bid.

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Body language expert dissects the power dynamic at play in the iconic Nancy Pelosi photo

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Last week, President Donald Trump met with Democrats at the White House to discuss the way both sides could work to fix the President's mistakes in Syria. Democrats left the White House saying that the President had another meltdown during the meeting, which prompted Trump to claim Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) was the one who had a meltdown. He then posted photos of Pelosi sitting quietly and another photo of Pelosi standing and pointing at him.

Body language expert Dr. Jack Brown posted the photo and gave his own analysis of what he believed was happening in the photo.

"When a person has little or no empathy — and/or when they're far from their emotional baseline, their ability to interpret how others will view an event becomes dramatically distorted," Brown explained Sunday. "Rarely has this behavioral axiom been better exemplified than last Wednesday at the White House."

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