Quantcast
Connect with us

Bobby Jindal has no comment on Louisiana school that allegedly harassed Buddhist student

Published

on

The administration of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal on Tuesday broke its silence over a public school that allegedly advised a Buddhist family to change their beliefs if they didn’t want their child to face harassment.

In a statement to The Times-Picayune, executive counsel Thomas Enright said the Jindal administration had no comment until both sides of the case were known. He also warned against the government restricting religious speech.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Religious freedom is foundational to liberty in America,” Enright said. “In this case, the plaintiffs are alleging violations of the establishment clause not the free exercise clause. We don’t want to comment on this particular case before hearing the defendant’s side of the story, but as a general rule, government needs to be very careful before making decisions that restrict any American’s religious freedoms.”

The American Civil Liberties Union and the ACLU of Louisiana filed a federal lawsuit against Negreet High School in Sabine Parish in January. A teacher at the school allegedly taught that the universe was created by God about 6,000 years ago. The same teacher is accused of calling 6th grade student “stupid” because he is a Buddhist and consequentially doesn’t believe in God.

When the parents of the students complained to Sabine Parish Superintendent Sara Ebarb, they were allegedly advised to change their faith or relocate their son to another school with more Asian students.

The Times-Picayune noted the Jindal administration commented on the case just days after warning of a “silent war” on religious freedom in a speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and Library.

Marjorie Esman, executive director of the ACLU of Louisiana, told The Times-Picayune that the Jindal administration’s statement on the Negreet High School was “disingenuous.” While Jindal is concerned with religious freedom, he is not concerned with the government establishment of religion, she implied.

ADVERTISEMENT

“This is an not an issue that concerns the governor’s office,” Esman said. “The allegations are what they are. The free exercise clause does not apply in this case because no one has the right to impose their religion on another. And the matter will work its way out in the court.”

[Image via Gage Skidmore, Creative Commons licensed]

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Unbelievable’: Ex-Trump official stunned president is still letting Giuliani run around unchecked in Ukraine

Published

on

In a Washington Post report on the continuing attempts by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani to dig up dirt on political opponents -- at the same time that President Donald Trump is facing impeachment for pressuring Ukraine with the promise of aid for the same -- a former Trump administration official expressed shock that Giuliani hasn't been told to stop.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘Hell no’: Texans join forces to stop Trump from stealing their land

Published

on

President Donald Trump's pledge to build a wall at the southern border with Mexico has been a huge winner with his base. But there is one group of people who are not happy: the Texans who actually live in the region where the wall would be built.

According to the Washington Post, many people in the region have no intention of letting the federal government seize their land to construct the wall, like Afghanistan war veteran Salvador Castillo of Brownsville, who received a letter from officials demanding unlimited access to and use of his land, which gradually escalated into a lawsuit.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Team Trump wants to steal another election — and there’s only one way to beat them back

Published

on

When I was growing up at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, back in the early 1960s, my mother drove down to Kansas City one morning to go shopping and have lunch with an old friend of her mother’s. Ladies going out shopping and having lunch in the upscale Country Club Plaza in Kansas City was almost a formal occasion. I remember she put on a summery suit and heels and stockings, and I’m pretty sure she wore a pair of white cotton gloves.

When she returned a few hours later, she wasn’t carrying any bags from the shops, and she was seething. The woman she’d eaten lunch with was married to a man who owned a chain of downtown hotels in major cities around the country. They lived in a big Tudor house in Mission Hills, the Beverly Hills of the Midwest. She drove a Cadillac. She was rich.

Continue Reading