Quantcast
Connect with us

U.S. urges ‘restraint’ between Japan and South Korea

Published

on

The United States on Tuesday urged its allies Japan and South Korea to show restraint in their tense relations as an American senator faulted Tokyo on historical disputes.

Danny Russel, the assistant secretary of state for East Asia, called on the two countries to look at the model of Japan and the United States, which have overcome the bitterness of World War II to nurture a close friendship.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We continue to stress the need for prudence and restraint, for all parties to take steps that will promote healing,” Russel said of Japan and South Korea.

“All parties can contribute to a reversal of the current atmosphere and the creation of a positive trend,” he told a Senate subcommittee.

Echoing remarks of Secretary of State John Kerry on a visit last month to Seoul, Russel said Japan and North Korea shared common challenges including uncertainties over nuclear-armed North Korea.

While Russel said historical disputes cannot “be resolved by one party alone,” the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations subcommittee on East Asia, Ben Cardin, faulted Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on historical disputes.

“The Japanese prime minister’s rhetoric on these issues is increasingly concerning to many,” said Cardin, a member of President Barack Obama’s Democratic Party.

ADVERTISEMENT

Cardin accused Abe of “provocative activities,” a likely reference to the Japanese leader’s December 26 pilgrimage to the Yasukuni shrine which honors 2.5 million war dead including convicted war criminals.

China and South Korea have accused Japan of showing insufficient remorse for atrocities in the 20th century. Abe is known for his conservative views on history and in the past has questioned whether imperial Japan directly coerced so-called “comfort women” into military brothels.

Japan in 1993 apologized to the women. Last week Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshihide Suga said that the government “would like to consider” setting up a verification team with academics to re-examine the accounts of 16 Korean women who testified ahead of the apology.

ADVERTISEMENT

South Korean President Park Geun-Hye, who has refused to meet Abe since she took office, said Saturday that Japan would face “isolation” if it revised the apology.

Respected historians say up to 200,000 women, mostly from Korea but also from China, Indonesia, the Philippines and Taiwan, were forced to serve as sex slaves in Japanese army brothels.

ADVERTISEMENT

[Image via Agence France-Presse]


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘People’s lives will be lost’: Psychiatrist warns ‘sociopath’ Trump is ‘getting worse’ — and failing in coronavirus response

Published

on

President Donald Trump's psychological problems are getting worse and could be consequential as America faces a potential COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell on Thursday interviewed Dr. Lance Dodes, a former assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

"As you pointed out, Lawrence, this man is about himself. He really is not about the country, he's not about public health," Dr. Dodes said of Trump.

"Although he has already severely damaged the country by being a psychopath or sociopath -- in many ways, he's damaged democracy -- I think people's lives will be lost now," he warned. "Individual lives will be lost because of the way he's mishandling the coronavirus issue."

Continue Reading

2020 Election

‘Something really rotten’: Here’s the evidence of extensive voter suppression in Georgia’s notorious 2018 election

Published

on

As the 2020 presidential campaign cycle grinds on, there’s renewed concern about the 21st century’s newest form of warfare: cyber-sabotage of government systems, including elections and online disinformation intended to incite unrest. But as Suppressed: The Fight to Vote, a documentary from Brave New Films, makes clear, partisan voter suppression tactics with 20th-century roots remain and can thwart multitudes of voters from changing their state’s political leaders.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

The real story behind Trump’s new lawsuit against the New York Times

Published

on

Wednesday was an ominous day for freedom of the press in this country, and I want to tell you why.

You may have heard or seen that President Trump filed a libel suit against the New York Times. Perhaps you weren’t surprised: the president is known to frequently disparage the Times even as he reads it obsessively. Borrowing a page from what I’ve referred to before as a Mount Rushmore of totalitarians, Robespierre, Hitler, Stalin and Mao, Trump loves to call the press the “enemy of the people.”

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image