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Guantanamo review board recommends sending bin Laden’s bodyguard back to Yemen

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A review board Friday recommended US officials repatriate a Yemeni man detained at Guantanamo for 12 years, saying the suspected Osama bin Laden bodyguard no longer poses a threat to US security.

Ali Ahmed Mohammed al-Rahizi, 34, was among the first 20 terror suspects brought to Guantanamo, on January 11, 2002. Last month he appeared before the Periodic Review Board, created in 2011 by the Obama administration as part of its goal to shutter the detention facility.

There are 154 men still held at the US Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, including 76 already cleared for release.

In Rahizi’s case, the PRB “by consensus, determined continued law of war detention of the detainee is no longer necessary to protect against a continuing significant threat to the security of the United States,” it said in a statement.

In recommending his return to his family home in the relatively stable region of Ta’izz, the board cited the detainee’s non-violent behavior at Guantanamo, his “credible” plans for the future and a “commitment not to repeat past mistakes.”

The PRB’s recommendations were made at a hearing and transmitted by audio to a listening room at the Pentagon.

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Rahizi was captured in December 2001 along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border. The PRB cited his low level of involvement with terror network Al-Qaeda, “including his lack of ties to at-large extremists.”

By receiving transfer approval, Rahizi could theoretically be repatriated now. But dozens of Yemenis, who constitute more than half of the prison’s detainees, already approved for transfer have languished at Guantanamo amid instability in Yemen.

On January 9 the PRB recommended repatriation of Yemeni Mahmoud al-Mujahid. But it refused to return a second Yemeni under consideration, Abdel Wahab al Malik Rahabi, who like Rahizi had been described as a former bodyguard of bin Laden.

[Image via Agence France-Presse]

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‘A true public health emergency’: 70+ medical groups sound alarm on climate crisis

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Groups lay out action agenda to advance climate solutions and strengthen resiliency

Scores of medical groups on Monday called the climate crisis "a health emergency" and laid out what they framed as a blueprint for the public and private sector to take swift action.

The agenda is signed by over 70 groups, including the American Medical Association, American Heart Association, Physicians for Social Responsibility, and the National Association of Social Workers.

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Citing CIA’s dark history, librarians protest agency’s recruiting at their conference

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"Everything they stand for is a violation of the values of librarianship, so we protested."

A group of librarians demanded the American Library Association abide by its values on Friday as they staged a protest of the CIA's presence and recruitment at the professional organization's annual conference.

At the convention, which is taking place June 20-25 in Washington, D.C., the CIA is among the hundreds of exhibitors.

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2020 Election

It’s Biden vs rest of Democrats in 1st 2020 debate clash

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For Democrats seeking to challenge Donald Trump in 2020, the rubber meets the road in Miami this week, where Joe Biden will defend his frontrunner status as presidential candidates finally square off face to face.

Americans are bracing for the nation's biggest political debate since the slugfests of 2016, a two-night showdown beginning Wednesday with 20 Democrats vying for a breakout moment that could showcase their talents, or see them stumble on the world stage.

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