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Hobby Lobby: Contraceptives are bad for employees, but good for business

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Hobby Lobby’s retirement fund invests in makers of contraceptives and the so-called ‘morning after’ pill, even though the company’s chief executives claim they are morally opposed to such drugs.

Mother Jones magazine reported Tuesday that Hobby Lobby held more than $73 million in “mutual funds with investments in companies that produce emergency contraceptive pills, intrauterine devices, and drugs commonly used in abortions.”

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This news will come as a revelation to anyone following the current Supreme Court Case in which the crafts store insists that to provide female employees with insurance coverage for contraception amounts to an unconscionable breach of their spiritual principles.

Documents filed with the Department of Labor in December of 2012 show that the company’s 401(k) employee retirement fund is invested in firms that manufacture the very drugs that Hobby Lobby’s founding family, the Greens, are trying to keep out of their employees’ hands.

According to Mother Jones‘ Molly Redden:

These companies include Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, which makes Plan B and ParaGard, a copper IUD, and Actavis, which makes a generic version of Plan B and distributes Ella. Other holdings in the mutual funds selected by Hobby Lobby include Pfizer, the maker ofCytotec and Prostin E2, which are used to induce abortions; Bayer, which manufactures the hormonal IUDs Skyla and Mirena; AstraZeneca, which has an Indian subsidiary that manufactures Prostodin, Cerviprime, and Partocin, three drugs commonly used in abortions; and Forest Laboratories, which makes Cervidil, a drug used to induce abortions. Several funds in the Hobby Lobby retirement plan also invested in Aetna and Humana, two health insurance companies that cover surgical abortions, abortion drugs, and emergency contraception in many of the health care policies they sell.

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The Affordable Care Act — also known as “Obamacare” — mandates that employers provide such coverage, particularly given that not all women take birth control pills specifically for contraception, but for a host of other medical conditions, including cystic acne, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, and to decrease the risk of certain cancers.

The Guttmacher Institute reported in 2011 that 52 percent of U.S. women who take the pill are doing so for non-contraceptive reasons.

[image of woman holding birth control pills via Shutterstock.com]

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Texas Republicans are abandoning the state’s GOP Speaker: ‘We no longer support him’

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Some of the most powerful Texas House Republicans said Monday they no longer support GOP Speaker Dennis Bonnen, marking the biggest blow yet to his political future amid the fallout from a secret recording released last week by a hardline conservative activist.

Five Republicans considered senior members of the lower chamber issued a statement withdrawing support for him: State Reps. Four Price of Amarillo, Dan Huberty of Houston, Lyle Larson of San Antonio, Chris Paddie of Marshall and John Frullo of Lubbock.

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Donald Trump is making a mockery of Marco Rubio — and the Florida senator is letting him

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Sen. Marco Rubio was once one of Donald Trump’s most formidable opponents; now, the Florida senator bends over backward to excuse the president’s corruption.

In 2016, Rubio and Trump sparred frequently on the Republican primary debate stage. Trump picked the uninspired nickname “Little Marco” for the senator, which didn’t seem to do much damage on its own, but Rubio never gained the momentum or strength that his backers hoped would prove to be strong enough to take down the reality TV candidate. As Rubio grew desperate, he launched one of his most memorable and pitiful attacks by stooping to his opponent’s level, implying that Trump had a small penis. It was more of an embarrassing moment for Rubio than anyone else, though Trump helped himself with a crude rejoinder.

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The faith of Fox News: How the network’s propaganda warps viewers’ sense of reality

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A longtime sticking point among Fox News employees is their insistent differentiation between its news division, where employees practice actual journalism, and its opinion division, where employees practice actual nativism, spew misinformation, and have been actively campaigning for Donald Trump’s re-election since 2016.  Inside the organization, they claim to believe that the news side is separate from the opinion side, and insist that the audience can tell the difference.

News anchor Shepard Smith once characterized comparing the two as “apples and teaspoons.”

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