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Hobby Lobby: Contraceptives are bad for employees, but good for business

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Hobby Lobby’s retirement fund invests in makers of contraceptives and the so-called ‘morning after’ pill, even though the company’s chief executives claim they are morally opposed to such drugs.

Mother Jones magazine reported Tuesday that Hobby Lobby held more than $73 million in “mutual funds with investments in companies that produce emergency contraceptive pills, intrauterine devices, and drugs commonly used in abortions.”

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This news will come as a revelation to anyone following the current Supreme Court Case in which the crafts store insists that to provide female employees with insurance coverage for contraception amounts to an unconscionable breach of their spiritual principles.

Documents filed with the Department of Labor in December of 2012 show that the company’s 401(k) employee retirement fund is invested in firms that manufacture the very drugs that Hobby Lobby’s founding family, the Greens, are trying to keep out of their employees’ hands.

According to Mother Jones‘ Molly Redden:

These companies include Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, which makes Plan B and ParaGard, a copper IUD, and Actavis, which makes a generic version of Plan B and distributes Ella. Other holdings in the mutual funds selected by Hobby Lobby include Pfizer, the maker ofCytotec and Prostin E2, which are used to induce abortions; Bayer, which manufactures the hormonal IUDs Skyla and Mirena; AstraZeneca, which has an Indian subsidiary that manufactures Prostodin, Cerviprime, and Partocin, three drugs commonly used in abortions; and Forest Laboratories, which makes Cervidil, a drug used to induce abortions. Several funds in the Hobby Lobby retirement plan also invested in Aetna and Humana, two health insurance companies that cover surgical abortions, abortion drugs, and emergency contraception in many of the health care policies they sell.

The Affordable Care Act — also known as “Obamacare” — mandates that employers provide such coverage, particularly given that not all women take birth control pills specifically for contraception, but for a host of other medical conditions, including cystic acne, endometriosis, ovarian cysts, and to decrease the risk of certain cancers.

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The Guttmacher Institute reported in 2011 that 52 percent of U.S. women who take the pill are doing so for non-contraceptive reasons.

[image of woman holding birth control pills via Shutterstock.com]


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2020 Election

Trump advisors futilely trying to get him to stop ranting about statues as his re-election prospects collapse: report

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According to a report focusing on Donald Trump's rally at Mt. Rushmore on the evening before the 4th of July, advisors to the president ate attempting to get him to start focusing on bread and butter issues that will get him re-elected instead of harping on statues being pulled down by protesters across the country.

As the Daily Beast report illustrates, their efforts appear to be futile based upon his Friday night speech.

With the president trying to fire up the crowd by insisting, “Angry mobs are trying to tear down statues of our founders. They think the American people are weak, and soft, and submissive,” the Beast reported that Trump, "decided to focus heavily Friday evening on protesters and Black Lives Matter activists who want various American monuments, including those honoring Confederate, white-supremacist, and slave-owning figures of history, torn down and destroyed for good. "

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Trump’s a traitor — and the Russian bounty scandal is the final straw

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The first story of the rest of Donald Trump's life was published last Friday in the New York Times, revealing that the Russian intelligence agency known as the GRU has been paying bonuses to Taliban fighters to kill Americans, and that this intelligence had been reported to Trump and had been known at least since March. The story was subsequently confirmed by the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and the AP.

This article first appeared in Salon.

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2020 Election

GOP scrambling to pay for Jacksonville convention after Trump yanked it from North Carolina: report

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According to a report from the New York Times, Republican officials are having difficulties getting donors to pay for the Republican National Convention to be held in Jacksonville, Florida after Donald Trump yanked the gathering out of Charlotte, North Carolina in a fit of pique over COVID-19 health restrictions.

At issue, the report notes, is that millions of dollars were spent in North Carolina where a smaller event will now be held, and now the party is, in essence, forced to pay for a second convention.

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