Quantcast
Connect with us

Federal firefighting budget reportedly $470 million short of requirement

Published

on

By Laura Zuckerman

SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) – The U.S. government expects to spend $470 million more than it has on hand to fight wildfires in a season that has already brought large blazes to California and Western states, where drought is worsening fire risks, federal officials said on Friday.

Predicted high temperatures and less moisture for much of the U.S. West are expected to boost firefighting costs to nearly $1.87 billion this year for agencies that only have $1.4 billion budgeted, according to the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management.

A provision in President Barack Obama’s 2015 budget proposal and legislation pending in Congress would use federal disaster funds for expenses tied to catastrophic wildfires, which represent 1 percent of blazes but which cost roughly $400 million a year to contain, according to fire managers.

Budget gaps come as federal agencies adjust to a “new normal” of wildfire seasons that start earlier and last longer, said Randy Eardley, spokesman for the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise.

ADVERTISEMENT

For instance, a blaze in southern California broke out on Wednesday, driven by Santa Ana winds, which sweep hot air from California’s desert through mountain passes and river canyons.

“The big fires in California tend to be in the fall with Santa Ana winds,” Eardley said.

The 2,200-acre fire north of the affluent community of Rancho Cucamonga in the foothills of the San Bernardino Mountains was 53 percent contained on Friday, and evacuation orders were lifted for hundreds forced to flee their homes, fire information officer Carol Underhill said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Fire risks are to remain high in May for drought-stricken states like California, Arizona, New Mexico and Alaska, and hazards will intensify in June for Nevada and Oregon, according to forecasts by the National Interagency Fire Center.

Snowfall and rain have reduced the threat of wildfires in the Northern Rockies for the moment, but continued drought in southwest Idaho will worsen the fire outlook there July through August, federal forecasts show.

Wildfires in the western United States have been growing larger and more frequent for the past 30 years, increasing by seven fires a year and expanding at a rate of 90,000 acres annually, according to a study by the University of Utah and University of California-Berkeley.

ADVERTISEMENT

The uptick in fires mostly affected areas with more severe drought, researchers said.

(Editing by Cynthia Johnston; Editing by David Gregorio)

[Image: Firefighters protect homes as a wildfire driven by fierce Santa Ana winds blows in Rancho Cucamonga, California, April 30, 2014. By David McNew for Reuters]


Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Democrat moves to impeach Trump immediately following House condemning president’s racism

Published

on

Immediately following the House of Representatives voting to condemn racist remarks by President Donald Trump, a Democrat introduced a privileged motion to impeach the president.

Rep. Al Green (D-TX) gave an impassioned speech to begin impeachment proceedings for Trump committing high crimes and misdemeanors.

"Therefore, Donald John Trump, by causing such harm to the society of the United States, is unfit to be president and warrants impeachment, trial and removal from office," he said.

Watch:

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump ‘reached into the Genesis chapter of the bigot’s bible’ to attack the Squad: journalist

Published

on

On Tuesday, journalist Jamil Smith wrote a column scorching President Donald Trump's attacks on "The Squad," as an act of utmost bigotry — and narcissism.

"Trump would surely love to run against these four women in 2020 rather than an actual opponent, positioning them all as racial bogeymen," wrote Smith. "It's a royal flush for his racist campaign: two black women, including one who wears a hijab and is a Somali refugee; a boricua from the Bronx; and a first-generation Palestinian-American from Detroit."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

House of Representatives votes for resolution condemning President Donald Trump’s racism

Published

on

President Donald Trump was condemned by the House of Representatives on Tuesday for his racist attacks on young women of color in Congress.

The resolution was passed with the support of every Democrat. The final vote was 240-187.

The text said "Trump’s racist comments have legitimized fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color."

The resolved that the body "strongly condemns President Donald Trump’s racist comments that have legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color by saying that our fellow Americans who are immigrants, and those who may look to the President like immigrants, should “go back” to other countries, by referring to immigrants and asylum seekers as “invaders,” and by saying that Members of Congress who are immigrants (or those of our colleagues who are wrongly assumed to be immigrants) do not belong in Congress or in the United States of America."

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

close-image