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House Oversight Committee subpoenas John Kerry over Benghazi

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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives Oversight Committee has issued a subpoena for Secretary of State John Kerry to testify at a May 21 public hearing concerning the attack on U.S. facilities in Benghazi, Libya, the committee said on Friday.

Committee Chairman Darrell Issa said the panel wanted Kerry to answer questions about the State Department’s response to the congressional investigation of the Benghazi attack on September 11, 2012, that killed four Americans.

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Issa, a Republican, said the State Department has not fully complied with previous subpoenas for documents related to the attack.

The Benghazi attack has become a political issue with Republicans saying President Barack Obama’s administration did not do enough to help the Americans in Benghazi and then focused on protecting Obama’s image during an election year.

The Kerry subpoena came a few days after Obama critics pounced on emails from U.S. officials released by the conservative watchdog group Judicial Watch on Tuesday. The group said the emails showed the White House was concerned primarily with image issues.

“The fact that these documents were withheld from Congress for more than 19 months is alarming,” Issa said in a letter to Kerry accompanying the subpoena. “The Department is not entitled to delay responsive materials because it is embarrassing or implicates the roles and actions of senior officials.”

Issa said the State Department had shown “a disturbing disregard” for its obligations to Congress.

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Benghazi also has political implications for Hillary Clinton, who was secretary of state at the time of the attack and is a likely presidential candidate in 2016.

(Reporting by Patricia Zengerle; Editing by Bill Trott and Susan Heavey)


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Trump continues a conspiracy that never ended as he covers up the cover up of a crime

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It’s hard to know where to begin discussing the president’s commutation of Roger Stone’s sentence. So let’s start with what it means. It’s not a pardon. Donald Trump’s goombah is still a felon convicted of witness tampering and lying to the US Congress. He plans to appeal the guilty verdict. “Commutation” merely means he won’t go to jail.

This article was originally published at The Editorial Board

The move was widely expected in Washington. Only the timing was in doubt. The president had hoped to wait until after the election, according to Bloomberg News, but Stone appears to have forced his hand. He feared prison would expose him to the new coronavirus, which can be fatal to people his age (67). Stone told a journalist Thursday that he believed the president would commute his sentence, because he stayed quiet while under pressure to cooperate. That statement, given the day before his 40-month sentence was to begin, was widely interpreted to mean: do it now or I start singing.

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COVID patients can be overwhelmed with inflammation. Doctors are learning to calm that ‘storm’

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In the millions of tiny air sacs tasked with absorbing oxygen in Brett Breslow’s lungs, the scene was chaos.Some of the sacs were swollen with fluid that had leaked from surrounding blood vessels. Others had simply collapsed. The grim result: the Cherry Hill man was starved of oxygen, leading doctors at Cooper University Hospital to put him on a ventilator for 19 days.Breslow was suffering from a massive bout of inflammation — a catch-all description for the damage in many of the sickest patients with COVID-19. In addition to the assault on his lungs, the disease was harming his liver and kidn... (more…)

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Gun drawn on Black driver pulled over by police in Minneapolis suburb — but they had the wrong guy

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MINNEAPOLIS — A Black man said thoughts of George Floyd went through his head as he sat in the back of a police squad car after officers pulled him over — at least one of them with gun drawn — in a Minneapolis suburb until they realized they had the wrong guy. “I could have been dead today,” Darrius Strong, 30, of Burnsville, said in an account he posted on Facebook soon after what began as a traffic stop early Friday afternoon along Old Shakopee Road. “Just remember … anything can happen to us, man, especially Black bodies … Black people, Black men. … Racial profiling is a thing.”A statement o... (more…)

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