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South Korea to donate warship to Philippines as tensions increase with China

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South Korea will donate a corvette warship to the poorly-equipped Philippine navy amid growing tensions — particularly with China — over maritime territorial disputes in the region, the government said Thursday.

The “Pohang-class corvette” will be decommissioned by the end of the year and donated to the Philippines, the Department of Foreign Affairs in Manila said in a statement issued this week.

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It was unclear if the donation would include the ship’s weapons systems.

South Korean Defence Minister Kim Kwang-jin informed his Filipino counterpart Voltaire Gazmin of the donation during his visit to Seoul on May 30, the statement added.

The gift follows South Korea’s recent donation of a landing craft and 16 rubber boats to the Philippines, it added.

“South Korea’s gesture is a small token compared with the great contribution of Filipino troops during the Korean War,” the South Korean minister was quoted as saying.

Officials at the Manila’s foreign ministry and the South Korean embassy could not be contacted for comment.

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The donation comes as the Philippines is facing increasing pressure from China over their conflicting claims to the South China Sea.

China claims most of South China Sea even up to the coasts of its neighbours and the Philippines has increasingly accused its larger neighbour of using bullying tactics to enforce its claim.

The Philippines, which has one of the most poorly-armed militaries in the region, has been upgrading its defence capabilities in recent years.

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It has also been improving its defence relations with South Korea and in March, it signed an agreement to buy 12 South Korean-made FA-50 jets for about $421.12 million.

[Image via Agence France-Presse]


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Denver cops busted for doing drive-by shootings of anti-police brutality protesters

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In a video posted to Twitter, a young Denver man protesting the killing of George Floyd at the hands of four former Minnesota police officers, found himself on the receiving end of an attack by police himself as he filmed them riding on the side of a truck -- only to have his phone hit by a fired police projectile while still in his hand.

According to Rachelle D'nae, a staff writer at Slate, her brother went to the Denver protest and was filming the officers when the incident occurred.

"My older brother went to a protest in Denver last night. as the police were leaving, one of them shot him with a pepper pellet that smashed the back of his phone and exploded in his face. they were ~30 feet from each other and it looks like the officer aimed directly at his face," she wrote before adding in a second tweet, "when my brother told me he was going I prepared for the worst. I made sure he had my number memorized so I could bail him out if I needed to and I sat up until he made it home, trying not to cry as he told me he had been tear-gassed."

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US military brought in to monitor police brutality protests in 7 states: leaked documents

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According to an exclusive report from The Nation, based upon Defense Department documents, U.S. military members are being dispatched to seven different states to monitor the activities of Americans who have taken to the streets to protest the death of George Floyd at the hands of four former Minneapolis cops.

The report, by the Nation's Ken Klippenstein, notes that states include, "Minnesota, where a Minneapolis police officer killed George Floyd, the military is tracking uprisings in New York, Ohio, Colorado, Arizona, Tennessee, and Kentucky, according to a Defense Department situation report," with the author pointing out, "Notably, only Minnesota has requested National Guard support."

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‘Absolute vacuum in leadership’: Internet shreds ‘coward’ Trump for hiding as 75 cities protest

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President Donald Trump is under fire Sunday after the White House announced he will not be seen today despite five days and nights of protests in more than 75 cities across the country and governors in at least ten states activating the National Guard.

Possibly more than at any time during his three-and-a-half year old administration Trump is taking tremendous criticism for how he has managed the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and for his handling of the protests against the killing by police of George Floyd.

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