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Bernie Sanders reminds CNN host: You can slam Obama, but Bush’s ‘blunder’ created ISIS

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Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) on Sunday told CNN host Candy Crowley that it was easy to criticize President Barack Obama’s fight against ISIS in Iraq, but he reminded her that it was President George Bush’s “disastrous blunder” that allowed the extremists group to get a foothold in the first place.

In a interview on CNN’s State of the Union, Sanders agreed that ISIS had to be defeated, but he said that “the people of America are getting sick and tired of the world and region — Saudi Arabia and the other countries — saying, ‘Hey, we don’t have to do anything about it. The American taxpayer, the American soldiers will do all the work for us.'”

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“Saudi Arabia is the fourth largest defense spender in the world,” he pointed out. “They have an army which is probably seven times larger than ISIS, they have a major air force. Their country is run by a royal family worth hundreds of billions of dollars.”

Sanders said that if the battle was perceived as the United States vs. ISIS then “we’re going to lose that war.”

“This is a war for the soul of Islam, and the Muslim nations must be deeply involved,” he insisted. “And to the degree the developed countries are involved, it should be the U.K., France, Germany, other countries as well.”

Crowley wondered if the Vermont senator agreed with the president’s handling of the conflict so far: “Is that too far for you or just about right?”

“It is very easy to criticize the president,” Sanders replied. “But this is an enormously complicated issue. We are here today because of the disastrous blunder of the Bush-Cheney era, which got us into this war in Iraq in the first place, which then developed the can of worms that we’re trying to deal with right now.”

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“We have been at war for 12 years, we have spent trillions of dollars,” he added. “We have 500,000 men and women who have come home with PTSD and [traumatic brain injuries]. What I do not want, and what I fear very much is the United States getting sucked into a quagmire, and being involved in perpetual warfare year after year after year. That is my fear.”

Watch the video below CNN’s State of the Union, broadcast Oct. 12, 2014.

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HBO’s Maher scorches Trump for calling coronavirus a ‘hoax’: ‘Not something he can lie his way out of’

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During the "Overtime" segment of HBO's "Real Time," host Bill Maher launched into a broadside against Donald Trump for telling South Carolina rallygoers that the coronavirus outbreak is a "hoax" being pushed by the media Democrats.

In a furious back and forth with conservative guest Buck Sexton, Maher said this was one instance where the president "could not lie his way out of it."

According to Sexton, the crisis is serious but then he tried to deflect from the issue by accusing Democrats of "trying to score political points," when they point out the Trump administration's bumbling response.

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Suspected ‘community transmission’ of coronavirus in third West Coast state: report

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Doctors in two more states reported suspected "community transmission" of coronavirus on Saturday.

The first reported case occurred in California. The second case in California was reported on Friday.

Then Oregon reported their first suspected coronavirus victim, an elementary school employee thought to be another case of community transmission.

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Americans who believe Trump’s spin on coronavirus will get ‘what they deserve’: former Ebola Czar

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President Donald Trump's credibility deficit is coming into play as Americans wonder whether to listen to his debunked claims or facts from medical experts on the COVID-19 coronavirus epidemic.

Former U.S. Ebola response coordinator Ron Klain, who was known as the "Ebola Czar," was interviewed Friday evening by Ali Velshi on MSNBC's "The Last Word."

Klain said the administration was facing a "crisis of both confidence and competence."

"On the confidence side, anyone who believes what Donald Trump says kind of gets what they deserve at this stage of the game," he argued. "But the problem is, the administration has silenced the people we can trust."

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